rss
Br J Sports Med 36:239-249 doi:10.1136/bjsm.36.4.239
  • Review

Achilles tendinopathy: some aspects of basic science and clinical management

  1. D Kader1,
  2. A Saxena2,
  3. T Movin3,
  4. N Maffulli4
  1. 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Aberdeen Medical School, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD, Scotland, UK
  2. 2Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Department of Sports Medicine, 795 El Camino Real, Palo Alto, CA 94301, USA
  3. 3Department of Surgery, Anaesthesiology, Radiology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, 141 86 Stockholm, Sweden
  4. 4Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, Keele University School of Medicine, North Staffordshire Hospital, Thornburrow Drive, Hartshill, Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire ST4 7QB, UK
  1. Correspondence to:
 Professor Maffulli, Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, Keele University School of Medicine, North Staffordshire Hospital, Thornburrow Drive, Hartshill, Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire ST4 7QB, UK;
 n.maffulli{at}keele.ac.uk
  • Accepted 18 January 2002

Abstract

Achilles tendinopathy is prevalent and potentially incapacitating in athletes involved in running sports. It is a degenerative, not an inflammatory, condition. Most patients respond to conservative measures if the condition is recognised early. Surgery usually involves removal of adhesions and degenerated areas and decompression of the tendon by tenotomy or measures that influence the local circulation.

Footnotes