Article Text

PDF
Dance training intensity at 11–14 years is associated with femoral torsion in classical ballet dancers
  1. D Hamilton1,
  2. P Aronsen1,
  3. J H Løken1,
  4. I M Berg1,
  5. R Skotheim1,
  6. D Hopper1,
  7. A Clarke2,
  8. N K Briffa1
  1. 1School of Physiotherapy, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia
  2. 2Centre for Research into Aged Care Services, Curtin University of Technology
  1. Correspondence to:
 Dr Briffa
 School of Physiotherapy, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia; k.briffa{at}curtin.edu.au

Abstract

Objective: To examine in a cross sectional study the influence of femoral torsion (FT) and passive hip external rotation (PER) on turnout (TO). Starting age, years of classical ballet training, and current and past dance training intensity were assessed to determine their influence on FT, PER, and TO in pre-professional female dancers.

Methods: Sixty four dancers (mean (SD) age 18.16 (1.80) years) were recruited from four different dance training programmes. They completed a dance history questionnaire. FT was measured using a clinical method. PER was measured with the subjects prone, and TO was measured with the subjects standing.

Results: Mean TO was 136°, mean unilateral PER was 49.4°, and mean FT was 18.4°. A positive correlation was observed between PER combined (PERC) and TO (r  =  0.443, p<0.001). A negative association was found between FT combined (FTC) and PERC (r  =  −0.402, p  =  0.001). No association was found between starting age or years of classical ballet training and FTC, PERC, or TO. Dancers who trained for six hours a week or more during the 11–14 year age range had less FT than those who trained less (mean difference 6°, 95% confidence interval 1.4 to 10.3). Students currently training for longer had higher levels of TO (p<0.001) but comparable PERC and FTC.

Conclusion: FT is significantly associated with PERC. Dancers who trained for six hours a week or more at 11–14 years of age had significantly less FT. FTC had a significant influence on PERC, but no influence on the execution of TO.

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Competing interests: none declared

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.