Article Text

Effects of heavy resistance exercise on fatigue and recovery during period of 48 h post-exercise in females
  1. M Touba1,
  2. A Lees2
  1. 1Sport Sciences and Physical Education, Al Fateh University, Tripoli, Libya
  2. 2Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK

Abstract

The objective of study two was to establish the heavy resistance exercise volume and intensity to produce a fatigue effect of a 40% reduction in measured force variables and to establish the fatigue and recovery responses over 48-h period. Subjects were familiarised with the same testing procedures in the pilot study. All subjects performed three sets of six different exercises (lying leg curls, dumbbell lunges, barbell squats, leg extensions, straight leg deadlift, leg presses) at an intensity corresponding to 70% of 1 RM (8-10 repetitions). A 1-min rest period was allowed between exercises and a 3-min rest period between sets. The isometric force measurements were also obtained 2 h, 24 h and 48 h recovery for maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and rate of force development (RFD). The data showed that there was a significant main effect of time on MVC for both legs (p=0.001). Post hoc analysis revealed a significant difference between pre- and post-exercise (p=0.001), pre-exercise and 2 h, 24 h (p=0.002) but no significant difference for 48 h (p=1.00). A significant main effect of time on MVC (p<0.001) for the dominant leg. Pairwise comparisons showed a significant difference between pre- and post-exercise at 2 h (p=0.001), but no significant difference between pre-exercise and after 24 h and 48 h (p=1.00). The RFD for both legs (p<0.001). Post-hoc analysis revealed a significant difference between pre- and post-exercise (p=0.001) and at 2 h, but no significant difference among pre-exercise, 24 h and 48 h (p=1.00). There was a significant main effect of time on RFD (p<0.001) for the dominant leg. Pairwise comparisons showed a significant difference between pre- and post-exercise (p=0.000) but no significant difference between pre-exercise and 2, 24 and 48 h (p=1.00). In this study it was found that using both legs at 70% of 1 RM was still not enough for the desired reduction, so further studies should increase the intensity of 1 RM.

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