Article Text

This article has a correction. Please see:

PDF
Determinants of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in young people: a review and quality synthesis of prospective studies
  1. Léonie Uijtdewilligen1,
  2. Joske Nauta1,
  3. Amika S Singh1,
  4. Willem van Mechelen1,2,
  5. Jos W R Twisk3,4,
  6. Klazine van der Horst5,
  7. Mai J M Chinapaw1,2
  1. 1Department of Public and Occupational Health, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  2. 2Body@Work, Research Center Physical Activity, Work and Health, TNO-VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  3. 3Department of Health Sciences, Section Methodology and Applied Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  4. 4Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  5. 5ETH Zürich, Institute for Environmental Decisions (IED), Consumer Behavior, Zürich, Switzerland
  1. Correspondence to Willem van Mechelen, Department of Public and Occupational Health, EMGO+ Institute, VU University Medical Center, van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081 BT Amsterdam, The Netherlands; w.vanmechelen{at}vumc.nl

Abstract

Objective The aim of this systematic review was to summarise and update the existing literature on determinants of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in young people, considering the methodological quality of the studies.

Methods Prospective studies were identified from searches in PubMed and PsycINFO, from April 2004 through November 2010. The authors included studies investigating the association between determinants of overall physical (in)activity and/or sedentary behaviour in healthy children or adolescents. When a determinant was investigated for its association with physical (in)activity and sedentary behaviour assessed between ages of 4–12, or mean age ≤12, it was classified as ‘child determinant’. When a determinant was investigated for its association with physical activity and sedentary behaviour assessed between ages of 13–18 or mean age >12, it was classified as ‘adolescent determinant’. Included articles were scored on their methodological quality and a best-evidence synthesis was applied to summarise the results.

Results The authors identified 30 papers, of which seven were of high methodological quality. Intention was found as a determinant of children's physical activity. Determinants of adolescents' physical activity were age (ie, older children were more active), ethnicity (ie, being of African–American descent determined being less physically active) and planning. The authors found insufficient evidence for determinants of sedentary behaviour.

Conclusion Studies on determinants of physical activity and sedentary behaviour were in general of poor methodological quality. To develop long-term effective interventions that increase physical activity and decrease time spent in sedentary behaviours in young people, we need more high quality prospective evidence on the determinants of these behaviours.

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Competing interests None.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.

Linked Articles

  • Electronic pages
    BMJ Publishing Group Ltd and British Association of Sport and Exercise Medicine