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The immediate effects of foot orthoses on functional performance in individuals with patellofemoral pain syndrome
  1. C J Barton1,2,
  2. H B Menz1,
  3. K M Crossley3
  1. 1Musculoskeletal Research Centre, Faculty of Health Sciences, La Trobe University Bundoora, Bundoora, Australia
  2. 2School of Physiotherapy, La Trobe University Bundoora, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia
  3. 3Department of Mechanical Engineering and School of Physiotherapy, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Christian Barton, Musculoskeletal Research Centre, Faculty of Health Sciences, La Trobe University Bundoora, Bundoora, VIC 3068, Australia; c.barton{at}latrobe.edu.au

Abstract

Objective Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) often results in reduced functional performance. There is growing evidence for the use of foot orthoses to treat this multifactorial condition. In this study, the immediate effects of foot orthoses on functional performance and the association of foot posture and footwear with improvements in function were evaluated.

Methods Fifty-two individuals with PFPS (18–35 years) were prescribed prefabricated foot orthoses (Vasyli Pro; Vasyli International, Labrador, Australia). Functional outcome measures evaluated included the change in (1) pain and (2) ease of a single-leg squat on a five-point Likert scale, and change in the number of (3) pain-free step downs and (4) single-leg rises from sitting. The association of foot posture using the Foot Posture Index, navicular drop and calcaneal angle relative to subtalar joint neutral; and the footwear motion control properties scale score with improved function were evaluated using Spearman's ρ statistics.

Results Prefabricated foot orthoses produced significant improvements (p<0.05) for all functional outcome measures. A more pronated foot type and poorer footwear motion control properties were found to be associated with reduced pain during the single-leg squat and improvements in the number of pain-free single-leg rises from sitting when wearing foot orthoses. In addition, a more pronated foot type was also found to be associated with improved ease of completing a single-leg squat when wearing foot orthoses.

Conclusion Prefabricated foot orthoses provide immediate improvements in functional performance, and these improvements are associated with a more pronated foot type and poorer footwear motion control properties.

Keywords foot orthoses; patellofemoral pain syndrome; functional performance; knee pain; insoles.

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Footnotes

  • Competing interests None.

  • Ethics approval This study was conducted with the approval of the La Trobe University's Faculty of Health Sciences Human Ethics Committee.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Patient consent Obtained.

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