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EFFECTS OF MILK AS A RECOVERY DRINK FOLLOWING EXERCISE ON SUBSEQUENT APPETITE AND ENERGY INTAKE IN FEMALE RECREATIONAL EXERCISERS
  1. E Shaw1,
  2. A Campbell1,
  3. L James2,
  4. PLS Rumbold1,
  5. EJ Stevenson1
  1. 1Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Northumbria University, Northumberland Building, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 8ST, UK
  2. 2School of Sport, Exercise and Health, Loughborough University, Ashby Road, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU, UK

Abstract

Several studies have highlighted the beneficial effects of milk and dairy product consumption in the alleviation of exercise-induced muscle damage, post-exercise soreness sensations and indeed the satiating effects on subsequent appetite and energy intake in adult populations. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of skimmed milk as a recovery drink following exercise on subsequent appetite and energy intake in female recreational exercisers. Using a randomised cross-over design, nine female recreational exercisers (20±1 y) completed a Graphic test followed by two main exercise trials (matched for energy expenditure 1.78±0.14 v. 1.75±0.19 MJ; p=0.600). Main trials were conducted following a standardised breakfast and were carried out during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Following 30 minutes of moderate–vigorous cycling exercise (65% Graphic) 600 mL of skimmed milk or 600 mL of orange juice (475 mL orange, 125 mL water), which were isoenergetic, was ingested followed 60 minutes later with an ad libitum pasta meal. Absolute energy intake was significantly less after consuming milk than after orange juice (2.39±0.70 v. 3.20±0.84 MJ, respectively; p=0.001). Relative energy intake (in relation to energy expenditure) was significantly lower after milk consumption compared to orange juice (0.61±0.72 v. 1.45±0.90 MJ, respectively; p=0.002). Relative energy intake (in relation to the energy content of the test beverages) was also significantly lower after milk consumption compared to orange juice (3.27±0.70 v. 4.13±0.84 MJ, respectively; p=0.003). There were no differences in AUC (x 3-h) subjective appetite parameters (hunger, fullness and desire to eat) between trials. In conclusion, the consumption of skimmed milk following 30 minutes of moderate-vigorous cycling exercise resulted in a reduction in subsequent energy intake, in female recreational exercisers.

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