rss
Br J Sports Med 47:304-307 doi:10.1136/bjsports-2013-092190
  • Review

The effects of rest and treatment following sport-related concussion: a systematic review of the literature

  1. Willem H Meeuwisse1,3
  1. 1Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  2. 2Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  3. 3Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  4. 4Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute for Child & Maternal Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada
  5. 5The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne & Melbourne Brain Centre, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
  6. 6Departments of Rehabilitation Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine and Neurological Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA
  7. 7Seattle Sports Concussion Program, Team Physician Seattle Seahawks and Seattle Mariners, Seattle, Washington, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Kathryn J Schneider, Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 1N4; kjschnei{at}ucalgary.ca
  • Received 15 January 2013
  • Accepted 20 January 2013

Abstract

Objective To evaluate the evidence for rest, treatment, and rehabilitation following sport-related concussion (SRC).

Data sources PubMed, CINAHL, PsychInfo, Cochrane Controlled Trials Registers, Health STAR, Sport Discus, EMBASE, Web of Science, and ProQuest.

Study selection Articles were included if they met the following criteria: original research, reported SRC as a source of injury, and evaluated the effect of rest or treatment.

Data extraction Study design, participants, treatment, outcome measures, and key findings.

Data synthesis Three studies met the inclusion criteria for evaluating the effects of rest and twelve for treatment. Low-intensity aerobic exercise may be of benefit.

Conclusions The current evidence evaluating the effect of rest and treatment following SRC is sparse. An initial period of rest may be of benefit. Low-level exercise and multimodal physiotherapy may be of benefit for those who are slow to recover. There is a strong need for high level studies evaluating the effects of rest and treatment following SRC.