Article Text

PDF
Objectively measured physical activity trajectories predict adolescent bone strength: Iowa Bone Development Study
  1. Kathleen F Janz1,2,
  2. Elena M Letuchy2,
  3. Trudy L Burns2,3,
  4. Julie M Eichenberger Gilmore4,
  5. James C Torner2,
  6. Steven M Levy2,5
  1. 1Department of Health and Human Physiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
  2. 2Department of Epidemiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
  3. 3Department of Pediatrics, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
  4. 4Department of Clinical and Translational Science, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
  5. 5Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Kathleen F Janz, Department of Health and Human Physiology, E130 FH, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA; kathleen-janz{at}uiowa.edu

Abstract

Background Physical activity improves bone strength and reduces the risk for osteoporotic fractures. However, there are substantial gaps in our knowledge as to when, how and how much activity is optimal for bone health.

Purpose In this cohort study, we examined developmental trajectories of objectively measured physical activity from childhood to adolescence to discern if moderate-and-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) predicts bone strength.

Methods Starting at age 5 and continuing at 8, 11, 13, 15 and 17 years, Iowa Bone Development Study participants (n=530) wore an accelerometer for 3–5 days. At age 17, we assessed dual X-ray energy absorptiometry outcomes of mass and estimated geometry (femoral neck cross-sectional area and section modulus). We also assessed geometric properties (bone stress index and polar moment of inertia) of the tibia using peripheral computer quantitative tomography. Latent class modelling was used to construct developmental trajectories of MVPA from childhood to late adolescence. General linear models were used to examine the trajectory groups as predictors of age 17 bone outcomes.

Results Girls and boys who accumulated the most MVPA had greater bone mass and better geometry at 17 years when compared to less active peers. The proportion of participants achieving high levels of MVPA throughout childhood was very low (<6% in girls) and by late adolescence almost all girls were inactive.

Conclusions Bone health benefits of physical activity are not being realised due to low levels of activity for most youth, especially in girls.

  • Adolescents
  • Bone mineral density
  • Children's health and exercise
  • Epidemiology
  • Physical activity measurement

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.

Linked Articles