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Effectiveness of physical therapy treatment of clearly defined subacromial pain: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials
  1. M N Haik1,
  2. F Alburquerque-Sendín2,3,
  3. R F C Moreira4,
  4. E D Pires1,
  5. P R Camargo1
  1. 1Laboratory of Analysis and Intervention of the Shoulder Complex, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, Brazil
  2. 2Salamanca Institute for Biomedical Research (IBSAL), Salamanca, Spain
  3. 3Department of Nursing and Physical Therapy, University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain
  4. 4Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, Brazil
  1. Correspondence to Dr Paula Rezende Camargo, Departamento de Fisioterapia, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rodovia Washington Luiz, km 235, Bairro Monjolinho, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905, Brazil; prcamargo{at}ufscar.br

Abstract

Aim To summarise the current evidence regarding the effectiveness of physical therapy on pain, function and range of motion in individuals with subacromial pain syndrome (SAPS).

Design Systematic review.

Data sources PubMed, Web of Science, CINAHL, Cochrane, Embase, Lilacs, Ibecs and Scielo databases.

Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating physical therapy modalities for SAPS on pain, function/disability or range of motion were included.

Results 64 high-quality RCTs were included. Exercise therapy provided high evidence of being as effective as surgery intervention and better than no treatment or placebo treatment to improve pain, function and range of motion in the short, mid and long terms. The combination of mobilisation and exercises provided high evidence to decrease pain and improve function in the short term. There is limited evidence for improvements on the outcomes with the isolated application of manual therapy. High level of evidence was synthesised regarding the lack of beneficial effects of physical resources such as low-level laser, ultrasound and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) on pain, function or range of motion in the treatment of SAPS. There is limited evidence for microwave diathermy and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. There is moderate evidence to no benefits with taping in the short term. Effects of diacutaneous fibrolysis and acupuncture are not well established yet.

Conclusions Exercise therapy should be the first-line treatment to improve pain, function and range of motion. The addition of mobilisations to exercises may accelerate reduction of pain in the short term. Low-level laser therapy, PEMF and taping should not be recommended.

  • Shoulder
  • Scapula
  • Exercise rehabilitation

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