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Sport climbing: medical considerations for this new Olympic discipline
  1. C Lutter1,2,3,
  2. Y El-Sheikh4,
  3. I Schöffl5,
  4. V Schöffl2,3,6
  1. 1 CVPath Institute, Gaithersburg, Maryland, USA
  2. 2 Department of Sports Orthopedics, Sports Medicine, Sports Traumatology, Klinikum Bamberg, Bamberg, Germany
  3. 3 Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Klinikum Bamberg, Bamberg, Germany
  4. 4 Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, North York General Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  5. 5 Department of Pediatrics, Klinikum Bamberg, Bamberg, Germany
  6. 6 Department of Trauma and Orthopedic Surgery, Friedrich Alexander University, Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany
  1. Correspondence to Dr C Lutter, CVPath Institute, 19 Firstfield Rd. Gaithersburg, MD 20878, USA;christoph.lutter{at}googlemail.com

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Since the recent announcement that Sport Climbing was selected to be part of the next Summer Olympic Games in 2020, climbers around the world are eager to see their sport on the most world-renowned athletic stage. A few days ago, the Tokyo 2020 Additional Event Programme Panel selected this very exciting and challenging sport, with its three subdisciplines (‘Lead Climbing’, ‘Speed Climbing’ and ‘Bouldering’), to be part of the next Summer Olympics. This landmark decision reflects a huge worldwide interest and enthusiasm for the relatively young sport of climbing, which has exploded in popularity in recent years.

This is an exciting time for sport climbers, coaches and fans; however, we would like to recommend a cautious and informed approach to establishing this sport as part of the Olympic …

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