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The effect of age on symptom reporting on the adult and child post concussion symptom scale in youth ice hockey players
  1. Amanda M Black1,
  2. Kathryn J Schneider2,
  3. Luz Palacios-Derflingher3,
  4. Willem H Meeuwisse4,
  5. Carolyn A Emery5
  1. 1Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre, Faculty of Kinesiology, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada
  2. 2Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre, Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Calgary, Canada
  3. 3Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre, Faculty of Kinesiology, Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada
  4. 4Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre, Faculty of Kinesiology, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada
  5. 5Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre, Faculty of Kinesiology, Paediatrics, Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute, Community Health Sciences, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada

Abstract

Objective To determine symptom reporting differences for children completing the adult and child version of the Post-Concussion Symptom Scale (PCSS) on the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 3 (SCAT3).

Design Cross-Sectional study.

Setting Community ice hockey teams, Alberta, Canada.

Participants Youth hockey players (n=891; 91.58% male, 10–14 years) who completed the PCSS on the Adult and Child version of the SCAT3 during a preseason baseline assessment.

Assessment of risk factors Adult versus child PCSS stratified by categorical age (10–12, 13–14).

Outcome measures Total number of symptoms, symptoms reported, and proportion equally reporting symptoms (0, ≥1) on both PCSS scales.

Main results Participants reported a median of 2 symptoms [Interquartile Range (IQR):0–21] on the adult scale (/22) and 5 (IQR:0-20) on the child scale (/20). There was no evidence of a difference in the proportion of participants reporting symptoms (0, ≥1) on both scales between age groups 10–12 (525/729, 72.02%) and 13–14 (121/160, 75.63%) (difference: −3.61% (95% confidence interval (−11.40%, 4.18%)). The most frequent symptoms reported on the adult PCSS by participants with no symptoms on the child PCSS were nervousness (11.27%) and neck pain (10.56%). Participants with no symptoms on the adult PCSS most commonly reported being easily distracted (45.29%) and forgetful (39.49%) on the Child PCSS.

Conclusions A greater number of symptoms were endorsed for all 10-14 year old subjects when using the Child SCAT3 PCSS. Neck pain was a commonly reported symptom for all age groups on the Adult SCAT3 PCSS, but this symptom is absent from the Child SCAT3.

Competing interests None.

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