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Impact of off-road competitive motocross race on plasma oxidative stress and damage markers
  1. Antonio A Ascensao (aascensao{at}fcdef.up.pt)
  1. Research Centre in Physical Activity Health and Leisure, Faculty of Sport Sciences, Portugal
    1. Rita Ferreira (rmferreira{at}fcdef.up.pt)
    1. Research Centre in Physical Activity Health and Leisure, Faculty of Sport Sciences, Portugal
      1. Franklim Marques (franklim{at}ff.up.pt)
      1. Department of Biochemistry and Clinical Analysis, Faculty of Pharmacy, Portugal
        1. Eduardo Oliveira (eoliveira{at}fcdef.up.pt)
        1. Dept Sports Biology, Faculty of Sports Sciences, Portugal
          1. Victor Azevedo (victor.safin{at}clix.pt)
          1. Faculty of Sports Sciences, Portugal
            1. José Soares (jmsoares{at}fcdef.up.pt)
            1. Dept Sports Biology, Faculty of Sports Sciences, Portugal
              1. José Magalhães (jmaga{at}fcdef.up.pt)
              1. Research Centre in Physical Activity Health and Leisure, Faculty of Sport Sciences, Portugal

                Abstract

                Objective: To analyze the impact of an off-road motocross heat on plasma levels of oxidative stress and damage, blood leukocyte counts and urine catecholamine concentration.

                Methods: Plasma contents of total (TGSH), reduced (GSH), oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, %GSSG, malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl and –SH groups, total antioxidant status (TAS) and uric acid (UA) as well as blood neutrophil and lymphocyte counts were evaluated in ten male top-level riders before, immediately and one hour after a simulated competitive motocross race. 24-hours urine adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine concentrations were also measured.

                Results: Motocross heat resulted in an increase in plasma oxidative stress and damage (p<0.05). This was observed by significant increase in %GSSG, TAS, MDA and carbonyls as well as by decrease in –SH after the race. There was a significant increase in both plasma UA and urine catecholamine concentration after the race (p<0.05). Blood neutrophil counts increased at zero and one hour after exercise (p<0.05). Lymphocyte counts increased from baseline to zero hours, although decreased from baseline and zero to one hour post exercise (p<0.05).

                Conclusion: The data reinforce the notable metabolic and hormonal demands imposed by motocross, resulting in a condition of enhanced plasma oxidative stress and damage.

                • antioxidants
                • free radicals
                • lipid peroxidation
                • motorcycling
                • protein oxidation

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