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Stress fracture risk factors in women soccer players and their clinical implications
  1. Stuart J Warden (stwarden{at}iupui.edu)
  1. Indiana University, United States
    1. Mark W. Creaby (m.creaby{at}unimelb.edu.au)
    1. University of Melbourne, Australia
      1. Adam L. Bryant (a.bryant{at}unimelb.edu.au)
      1. University of Melbourne, Australia
        1. Kay M. Crossley (k.crossley{at}unimelb.edu.au)
        1. University of Melbourne, Australia

          Abstract

          A stress fracture represents the inability of the skeleton to withstand repetitive bouts of mechanical loading which results in structural fatigue, and resultant signs and symptoms of localized pain and tenderness. Reports of stress fractures in women soccer players are not prevalent; however, they are likely underreported and their significance lies in the morbidity that they cause in terms of time lost from participation. By considering risk factors for stress fractures in women soccer players it may be possible to reduce the impact of these troublesome injuries. Risk factors for stress fractures in women soccer players include intrinsic risk factors such as gender, endocrine, nutritional, physical fitness and neuromusculoskeletal factors, as well as extrinsic risk factors such as training program, equipment and environmental factors. This paper discusses these risk factors, and discusses their implications in terms of developing prevention and management strategies for stress fractures in women soccer players.

          • bone
          • exercise
          • football
          • microdamage
          • overuse

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