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Effect of 12 weeks of moderate–intensity resistance training on arterial stiffness: A randomized controlled trial in women aged 32-59
  1. Mutsuko Yoshizawa (myoshizawa{at}med.taiiku.tsukuba.ac.jp)
  1. Division of Sports Medicine, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences University of Tsukuba, Japan
    1. Seiji MAEDA (smaeda{at}tara.tsukuba.ac.jp)
    1. Division of Sports Medicine, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences University of Tsukuba, Japan
      1. Asako Miyaki
      1. Division of Sports Medicine, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences University of Tsukuba, Japan
        1. Maiko Misono
        1. Division of Sports Medicine, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences University of Tsukuba, Japan
          1. Yoko Saito
          1. Division of Sports Medicine, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences University of Tsukuba, Japan
            1. Kai Tanabe
            1. Division of Sports Medicine, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences University of Tsukuba, Japan
              1. Shinya Kuno
              1. Division of Sports Medicine, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences University of Tsukuba, Japan
                1. Ryuichi Ajisaka
                1. Division of Sports Medicine, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences University of Tsukuba, Japan

                  Abstract

                  Background: Resistance training has been increasingly incorporated into the overall exercise program because of its impact on muscle strength, functional capacity, and osteoporosis. High-intensity resistance training increases arterial stiffness. However, the effect of moderate-intensity resistance training on arterial stiffness is unknown.

                  Objective: To determine whether 12 weeks of moderate-intensity resistance training increases arterial stiffness in middle-aged women.

                  Methods: Thirty-five middle-aged women (32・9 years old) volunteered to participate. The subjects were randomly assigned to one of the following interventions: resistance training group, aerobic exercise training group, or control group. Resistance training group and aerobic exercise training group performed 12 weeks of moderate-intensity resistance training or aerobic exercise training (two days a week).

                  Results: In resistance training group, one-repetition maximal strength significantly increased after the intervention. Interestingly, aortic (carotid-femoral) pulse wave velocity (PWV), an index of arterial stiffness, and peripheral (femoral-ankle) PWV did not change with moderate-intensity resistance training. On the other hand, in aerobic exercise training group, carotid-femoral PWV significantly decreased after the intervention. Resistance training and aerobic exercise training did not affect blood pressure.

                  Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that moderate-intensity resistance training did not increase arterial stiffness in middle-aged women, which may have great significance for health promotion with resistance training.

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