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Mechanisms for anterior cruciate ligament injuries in badminton
  1. Yuka Kimura,
  2. Yasuyuki Ishibashi,
  3. Eiichi Tsuda,
  4. Yuji Yamamoto,
  5. Harehiko Tsukada,
  6. Satoshi Toh
  1. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Japan
  1. Correspondence to Dr Yuka Kimura, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Zaifu-cho 5, Hirosaki 036-8562, Japan; yukax10{at}cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp

Abstract

Introduction A high incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries related to sports activities has been reported; however, the injury situation of ACL injury in badminton has not been elucidated. This study investigated the mechanism of ACL injury in badminton using a questionnaire.

Methods Information on injury mechanism was gathered from interviews with six male and 15 female badminton players who received a non-contact ACL injury playing badminton and underwent ACL reconstruction.

Results The most common injury mechanism (10 of 21 injuries) was single-leg landing after overhead stroke. Nine of 10 players had injured the knee opposite to the racket-hand side. The second most frequent injury mechanism (eight of 21 injuries) was plant-and-cut while side-stepping or backward stepping. All eight players injured the knee of the racket-hand side. Eleven injuries occurred in the rear court, and six of the 11 injuries occurred during single-leg landing after an overhead stroke.

Conclusion The knee opposite to the racket-hand side tended to sustain the ACL injuries during single-leg landing after a backhand overhead stroke, whereas the knee of the racket-hand side tended to be injured by plant-and-cut during side or backward stepping. These injury patterns appear to be due to specific movements during badminton.

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Footnotes

  • Competing interests None.

  • Patient consent Obtained.

  • Ethics approval This study was conducted with the approval of the Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine Institutional Review Board.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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