Article Text

other Versions

PDF
Prevention of sports injury I: a systematic review of applied biomechanics and physiology outcomes research
  1. Kellen McBain1,
  2. Ian Shrier2,3,
  3. Rebecca Shultz3,4,
  4. Willem H Meeuwisse3,5,
  5. Martin Klügl1,
  6. Daniel Garza1,
  7. Gordon O Matheson1,3
  1. 1Division of Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California, USA
  2. 2Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Community Studies, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  3. 3Research Alliance in Sport and Exercise Medicine
  4. 4Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California, USA
  5. 5Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  1. Correspondence to Ian Shrier, Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Community Studies, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, 3755 Cote Ste-Catherine Road, Montreal, QC H2T 2Y6, Canada; ian.shrier{at}mcgill.ca

Abstract

Objective To analyse published articles that used interventions aimed at investigating biomechanical/physiological outcomes (ie, intermediate risk factors) for sport injury prevention in order to characterise the state of the field and identify important areas not covered in the literature.

Data sources PubMed, Cinahl, Web of Science and Embase were searched using a broad search strategy.

Main results Only 144 of 2525 articles retrieved by the search strategy met the inclusion criteria. Crossover study designs increased by 175% in the late 1980s until 2005 but have declined 32% since then. Randomised controlled trial (RCT) study designs increased by 650% since the early 1980s. Protective equipment studies (61.8% of all studies) declined by 35% since 2000, and training studies (35.4% of all studies) increased by 213%. Equipment research studied stability devices (83.1%) and attenuating devices (13.5%) whereas training research studied balance and coordination (54.9%), strength and power (43.1%) and stretching (15.7%). Almost all (92.1%) studies investigated the lower extremity and 78.1% were of the joint (non-bone)-ligament type. Finally, 57.5% of the reports studied contact sports, 24.2% collision and 25.8% non-contact sports.

Conclusion The decrease in crossover study design and increase in RCTs over time suggest a shift in study design for injury prevention articles. Another notable finding was the change in research focus from equipment interventions, which have been decreasing since 2000 (35% decline), to training interventions, which have been increasing (213% increase). Finally, there is very little research on overuse or upper extremity injuries.

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.