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Br J Sports Med doi:10.1136/bjsm.2010.081430
  • Original article

The association between sedentary leisure and physical activity in middle-aged adults

  1. Gavin Turrell3
  1. 1School of Human Movement Studies, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  2. 2School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  3. 3School of Public Health, QUT, Kelvin Grove Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Nicola Burton, School of Human Movement Studies, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia; nburton{at}hms.uq.edu.au
  • Accepted 22 March 2011
  • Published Online First 2 May 2011

Abstract

Aim The aim of this study was to examine the association between time spent in sedentary leisure and physical activity level in mid-aged men and women.

Methods Data were from the 2007 HABITAT study in Brisbane, Australia. A mail survey sent to 17 000 adults (40–65 years) provided 11 037 responses (68.5%), and 9121 (82.6%) were analysed. Sedentary leisure was quantified as hours/day spent sitting watching television, in home computer use, in general leisure, and overall, on a usual week and weekend day. Physical activity level (no activity, low, recommended, high, very high) included walking, moderate and vigorous activity combined into a measure of MET.min/week. Data were analysed separately for men and women using multilevel multinomial logistic regression with adjustment for sociodemographic and health variables.

Results The only significant negative associations were between watching television on a week day and high activity in men (0.91; 0.83–0.98), and home computer use on a weekend day and very high activity in men (0.89; 0.81–0.98). For both men and women, there were significant positive associations between overall sedentary leisure time on a week day and very high activity (men: 1.07, 1.02–1.13; women: 1.10, 1.04–1.16), home computer use on a week day and very high activity (men: 1.11, 1.01–1.22; women: 1.15, 1.04–1.27) and general leisure on a week day and most activity levels.

Conclusions Sedentary leisure is mainly independent of physical activity and does not preclude meeting physical activity recommendations.

Footnotes

  • Funding The HABITAT study is supported by project grants from the (Australian) National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) (ID 339718, 497236) and includes Professor Billie-Giles Corti, Professor Brian Oldenburg and Dr Katrina Giskes as chief investigators. During the time of this study, NWB was supported by a Heart Foundation Research Fellowship (PH08B3905) and an NHMRC Program Grant (569940). GT is supported by an NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship (390109).

  • Competing interests None.

  • Ethics approval This study was conducted with the approval of The University of Queensland.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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