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Br J Sports Med doi:10.1136/bjsports-2012-091689
  • Editorial

Tackling community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aurues (CA-MRSA) in collegiate football players following implementation of an anti-MRSA programme and has been revised after receiving peer review information

  1. Charles L Bennett1
  1. 1Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Outcomes Sciences, South Carolina College of Pharmacy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA
  2. 2Department of Family Medicine, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, South Carolina, USA
  3. 3Athletic Training Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr S Scott Sutton, Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Outcomes Sciences, South Carolina College of Pharmacy, University of South Carolina, 715 Sumter Street, Columbia, SC 29208, USA; sutton{at}sccp.sc.edu
  • Received 8 October 2012
  • Revised 3 January 2013
  • Accepted 16 January 2013
  • Published Online First 16 February 2013

Competitive football players’ safety has become an important concern at the high school, collegiate and professional level and warrants attention.1–4 From 2003 to 2008, five players at our institution developed clinically significant community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) skin infections requiring hospitalisation and intravenous antibiotics. In 2008, the University of South Carolina team instituted anti-MRSA precautions based on recommendations made by the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (CDC) (box 1). In an attempt to understand if guidelines recommended by the CDC resulted in low MRSA colonisation rates, we randomly selected players on a Division I collegiate football programme to evaluate colonisation for MRSA obtained from nares, helmets and shoulder pads. Inclusion criteria were age 18 or older and current team member. Exclusion criteria were presence of skin infection, receiving antibiotics or hospitalisation in the prior month. The study received IRB approval and informed consent was obtained from study participants. A research assistant or team physician obtained specimens from the nares, helmet and shoulder pads with a …

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