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Genomics of elite sporting performance: what little we know and necessary advances
  1. Yannis Pitsiladis1,
  2. Guan Wang1,
  3. Bernd Wolfarth2,
  4. Robert Scott3,
  5. Noriyuki Fuku4,
  6. Eri Mikami4,
  7. Zihong He5,
  8. Carmen Fiuza-Luces6,
  9. Nir Eynon7,
  10. Alejandro Lucia6
  1. 1College of Medicine, Veterinary and Life Sciences, Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, UK
  2. 2Department of Preventive and Rehabilitative Sports Medicine, Technical University Munich, Munich, Germany
  3. 3MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, Cambridge, UK
  4. 4Department of Genomics for Longevity and Health, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo, Japan
  5. 5Biology Center, China Institute of Sport Science, Beijing, China
  6. 6School of Doctorate Studies and Research, European University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  7. 7Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living (ISEAL), Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Dr Yannis Pitsiladis, College of Medicine, Veterinary and Life Sciences, Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ, Scotland; Yannis.Pitsiladis{at}Glasgow.ac.uk

Abstract

Numerous reports of genetic associations with performance-related phenotypes have been published over the past three decades but there has been limited progress in discovering and characterising the genetic contribution to elite/world-class performance, mainly owing to few coordinated research efforts involving major funding initiatives/consortia and the use primarily of the candidate gene analysis approach. It is timely that exercise genomics research has moved into a new era utilising well-phenotyped, large cohorts and genome-wide technologies—approaches that have begun to elucidate the genetic basis of other complex traits/diseases. This review summarises the most recent and significant findings from sports genetics and explores future trends and possibilities.

  • Genetics/sex testing

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    BMJ Publishing Group Ltd and British Association of Sport and Exercise Medicine