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Prevention of non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injuries: PEDro synthesis
  1. Luiz Carlos Hespanhol Junior1,
  2. Steven J Kamper2,3
  1. 1Department of Public & Occupational Health, EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  2. 2Musculoskeletal Division, The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  3. 3Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  1. Correspondence to Luiz Carlos Hespanhol Junior, Department of Public & Occupational Health, EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, Amsterdam 1081 BT, The Netherlands; l.hespanhol{at}outlook.com

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This section features a recent systematic review that is indexed on PEDro, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (http://www.pedro.org.au). PEDro is a free, web-based database of evidence relevant to physiotherapy.

▸ Gagnier JJ, Morgenstern H, Chess L. Interventions designed to prevent anterior cruciate ligament injuries in adolescents and adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Am J Sports Med 2013;41:1952–62.

Background

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are considered one of the most important orthopaedic problems in sports medicine, especially in young female athletes1 with incidence ranging from 0.01% to 0.05% per year in the general population, 0.15–7.32% per year in professional athletes and from 0.002% to 1.62% per year in amateur athletes.2 The most common mechanism of injury involves hyperextension or torsion of the knee joint during a non-contact event.1 ACL injuries are particularly common in various football codes, basketball, gymnastics, volleyball, softball, hockey (ice and field) and wrestling.3 ,4 Comorbid and subsequent injuries are frequently found in people who have had ACL injuries (eg, early-onset osteoarthritis).1 The burden of ACL injuries includes individual pain and loss of function, cost to the healthcare system due to operative and non-operative rehabilitation and loss of productivity.1 ,5 ,6 Thus effort has been made to develop ACL injury prevention programmes. Previous systematic reviews have been published and report the effectiveness of neuromuscular training programmes on the prevention of ACL injuries …

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