Article Text

other Versions

PDF
The impact of psychological readiness to return to sport and recreational activities after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction
  1. Clare L Ardern1,2,
  2. Annika Österberg2,3,
  3. Sofi Tagesson2,
  4. Håkan Gauffin4,
  5. Kate E Webster1,
  6. Joanna Kvist2
  1. 1School of Allied Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  2. 2Division of Physiotherapy, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden
  3. 3Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland, Uppsala University, Eskilstuna, Sweden
  4. 4Orthopaedic Department, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden
  1. Correspondence to Dr Clare Ardern, School of Allied Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC 3086, Australia; c.ardern{at}latrobe.edu.au

Abstract

Background This cross-sectional study aimed to examine whether appraisal of knee function, psychological and demographic factors were related to returning to the preinjury sport and recreational activity following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction.

Method 164 participants completed a questionnaire battery at 1–7 years after primary ACL reconstruction. The battery included questionnaires evaluating knee self-efficacy, health locus of control, psychological readiness to return to sport and recreational activity, and fear of reinjury; and self-reported knee function in sport-specific tasks, knee-related quality of life and satisfaction with knee function. The primary outcome was returning to the preinjury sport or recreational activity.

Results At follow-up, 40% (66/164) had returned to their preinjury activity. Those who returned had more positive psychological responses, reported better knee function in sport and recreational activities, perceived a higher knee-related quality of life and were more satisfied with their current knee function. The main reasons for not returning were not trusting the knee (28%), fear of a new injury (24%) and poor knee function (22%). Psychological readiness to return to sport and recreational activity, measured with the ACL-Return to Sport after Injury scale (was most strongly associated with returning to the preinjury activity). Age, sex and preinjury activity level were not related.

Conclusions Less than 50% returned to their preinjury sport or recreational activity after ACL reconstruction. Psychological readiness to return to sport and recreation was the factor most strongly associated with returning to the preinjury activity. Including interventions aimed at improving this in postoperative rehabilitation programmes could be warranted to improve the rate of return to sport and recreational activities.

  • ACL
  • Knee ACL
  • Sport and exercise psychology

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.

Linked Articles