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Thirty years of investigation on the ergogenic effects of sodium citrate: is it time for a fresh start?
  1. Vitor de Salles Painelli,
  2. Antonio Herbert Lancha Junior
  1. Laboratory of Applied Nutrition and Metabolism, School of Physical Education and Sport, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  1. Correspondence to Dr Vitor de Salles Painelli, Laboratory of Applied Nutrition and Metabolism, School of Physical Education and Sport, University of São Paulo, Av. Mello de Moraes 65—Butanta, Sao Paulo 05508-030, Brazil; vitor.painelli{at}usp.br

Abstract

Sodium citrate (SCit) supplementation has been studied for several years as a strategy to reduce the muscle fatigue induced by H+ ion accumulation within the skeletal muscle during high-intensity, short-duration exercise. Several investigations have been published on this matter, and appear to indicate that SCit is not effective as an ergogenic aid, despite its ability to increase extracellular buffering capacity. In this short report, we briefly discuss the SCit results previously published in the literature and consider them in light of new and promising findings, which appear to address issues associated with previous study designs. We also suggest possible reasons for the current lack of reported ergogenic effects from this nutritional strategy and make recommendations that may re-define research in this area.

  • Fatigue
  • Athlete
  • Supplements

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