Article Text

PDF
Training load and structure-specific load: applications for sport injury causality and data analyses
  1. Rasmus Oestergaard Nielsen1,
  2. Michael Lejbach Bertelsen1,
  3. Merete Møller1,
  4. Adam Hulme2,3,
  5. Johann Windt4,5,
  6. Evert Verhagen2,6,
  7. Mohammad Ali Mansournia7,8,
  8. Martí Casals9,10,
  9. Erik Thorlund Parner11
  1. 1Section for Sports Science, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark
  2. 2Australian Collaboration for Research into Injury in Sports and its Prevention (ACRISP), Federation University Australia, Ballarat, Australia
  3. 3Centre for Human Factorsand Sociotechnical Systems, University of the Sunshine Coast, Queensland
  4. 4Experimental Medicine Program, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  5. 5Centre for Hip Health and Mobility, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  6. 6Department of Public and Occupational Health, Amsterdam Collaboration on Health & Safety in Sports, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam Movement Science, Vancouver, Netherlands
  7. 7Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  8. 8Sports Medicine ResearchCenter, Neuroscience Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  9. 9Sport Performance Analysis Research Group, University of Vic, Barcelona, Spain
  10. 10Research Centre Network for Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain
  11. 11Section for Biostatistics, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark
  1. Correspondence to Professor Mohammad Ali Mansournia, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 11111111, Iran; mansournia_ma{at}yahoo.com

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Definitions

Training load

Training load represents step count, throws, distance run and/or time spent practising sport. This can be used to calculate a change in training load over time (eg, acute:chronic workload ratio or week-to-week changes), which has been used as a time-varying exposure to sports injury recently.

Structure-specific cumulative load

Can be viewed as the sum of step-specific or throw-specific loads that a certain musculoskeletal structure is exposed to during a training session. Estimation of the structure-specific cumulative load per training session involves stepwise or throw-wise quantification of the load distribution and the load magnitude.

Structure-specific load capacity

Can be defined as a certain structure’s ability to withstand structure-specific cumulative load.

Introduction

How should I schedule my training? How much is too much? Coaches and sports medicine clinicians commonly face such questions when considering training and injury risk. These are highly relevant inquiries, as training load is a necessary cause of sports injury.1 2 To provide answers, our analytical approaches should align with causal frameworks. Changes in training load (eg, acute:chronic workload ratio) has been used as an interesting exposure to injury lately3–5 and promoted as proximal in the causal chain to sports injury.2 6 However, the aetiology behind sports injury development is multifactorial.1 Therefore, more variables (eg, body mass, alignment, diet, strength) than training load are necessary to robustly identify ‘how much is too much’.7 Accordingly, the purpose of this editorial is to describe the differences among the concepts ‘training-load’, ‘structure-specific load’ and ‘load capacity’, including the varied exposures that define them.

Athletes at different risks

Sports injury prevention scientists should carefully consider how best to phrase their research questions in aetiological …

View Full Text

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.