eLetters

50 e-Letters

published between 2002 and 2005

  • Comparative Physiology
    Craig Sharp

    Dear Editor

    It was a pleasure to read Paul McRory championing the cause of comparative animal and human physiology, and of his equine example.(1) To the latter he might have added that, because the horse is entirely a nasal breather, attempts were made, from 1800 BC in Egypt to 17th century Europe, to increase its ventilation by slitting the nostrils, paralleling the (equally futile) attempts of modern runners with nas...

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  • Authors reply: Defining a cricket injury
    John Orchard

    Dear Editor,

    We thank Mitchell and Hayen for their criticisms of our consensus definition of cricket injuries. We agree that our “injury” definition is based on maintenance of high level function (i.e., ability to continue playing at elite level) rather than physical tissue damage. We accept that this introduces a certain bias into the definition, namely that some players may be able to continue to play with a cert...

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  • Defining a cricket injury
    Rebecca Mitchell

    Dear Editor,

    While Orchard and colleagues[1,2] should be congratulated for their attempt at developing an international consensus on the definition of a cricket-related injury, a broader look at the literature on definitions of injury might have provided a more robust definition of a cricket injury.

    Orchard et al.[1, 2] define a cricket injury (or significant injury) as “any injury or other medical conditio...

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  • Treatment of hyperthermia
    Evan L Lloyd

    Dear Sir

    Much of the controversy about the cooling methods used in hyperthermia arises because of a failure to consider the underlying physiology. There are two distinct mechanisms for the development of hyperthermia, SLOW and FAST, and each requires a different method of cooling.

    The SLOW hyperthermia involves exposure to heat with only mild physical activity. In this situation the hyperthermia develo...

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  • Authors' reply
    Bill T Vicenzino

    Dear Editor,

    It is with interest we read the comments by Rompe, regarding our systematic review and we take this opportunity to respond.

    1. Rompe found it ‘annoying’ that our systematic review showed no benefit in the use of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for lateral epicondylalgia (LE) and did not include recent evidence. The census date of our comprehensive database searches was clearly stated...

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  • Cooling heat stroke patients
    Yoram Epstein

    Dear Editor,

    Smith in his recent article in the Br J Sports Med highlights the importance of aggressively cooling heat stroke victims to improve prognosis.[1] The paper extensively reviews the major cooling methods, and the author advocates the immersion in an ice-cold bath as the method of choice. Whereas this conclusion might be true for young patients who may tolerate aggressive treatment with ice water (1–5°C...

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  • The changing scenario of providing doping to athletes
    Giuseppe Lippi

    Dear Editor,

    There is a long history of doping in sport. Since the ancient Greco- Roman times, ergogenic aids in form of natural products, bland chemicals and animal extracts, have been commonplace in the attempt to push human performances to the limit. In recent times, remarkable advances in science and biotechnology have favoured the introduction of synthetic molecules, recombinant hormones and genetic manipulatio...

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  • A Short Reply To Russell
    Mark McDowell, MBA, Ph.D.

    Dear Editor,

    We appreciate Russell's comments and additional analyses. While there may be minor points where we still disagree, it is clear from Russell's comments that he supports our general hypothesis that there is indeed a safety concern in the sport of slow-pitch softball. We continue to stand by our field-testing research as well as published human response time studies that support our claims that the sp...

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  • Myoglobinuria paradox
    Joseph H. Keffer

    Dear Editor,

    Your diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis appears warranted on the basis of the "dark urine" and "muscle aches combined with massive elevation of creatine kinase. However, I cannot accept the report that there was no myoglobinuria present in these individuals. The urine is dark due to the myoglobin and in view of the CK increase in the thousands, myoglobin must have been present. Many laboratories use outdated and...

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  • Iliac spine avulsions
    Constance M. Lebrun

    Dear Editor,

    I was interested to read your recent article in the British Journal of Sports Medicine on a sequential AIIS avulsions in an adolescent long jumper. I have recently had a young patient who was a soccer player, with two sequential avulsions on the right side of the AIIS within a shorter time frame. I would just like to point out, however, that on the xray, especially in Figure 1, it appears as if the injur...

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