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Challenging beliefs in sports nutrition: are two ‘core principles’ proving to be myths ripe for busting?
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  • Published on:
    Endurane Running and nutrition

    The article suggests that using fat as an energy source is how to fuel endurance events.

    Why is it that top marathons runners and the SKY/GB team don't do this but have a good balance of mainly carbohydrate and protein?

    Because using fat requires 3% more oxygen for the same amount of energy. Thus energy release is slower and it is why top athletes train specifically to perform glycogen depleted. If you...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Response to: "Challenging beliefs in sports nutrition: are two 'core principles' proving to be myths ripe for busting?"

    The editorial by Brukner [1] provokes an interesting debate around two nutrition-related principles that are certainly worth of discussion. There are however, some points that may be misleading to some readers, particularly regarding the second point. The major problem is the oversimplification of complex issues, which begins in the description of the "principle": "The optimum diet for weight control, general health and a...

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    None declared.