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How much is too much? (Part 1) International Olympic Committee consensus statement on load in sport and risk of injury
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    The ACWR model presented in the IOC consensus is flawed and not validated

    The BJSM recently rejected our request of retraction or errata corrige of the editorials by Blanch and Gabbett(1) and Gabbett (2) presenting the relation between the Acute:Chronic Workload Ratio (ACWR) and likelihood of injuries. The preprint and a list of some of the errors presented in that figure can be found here: https://osf.io/preprints/sportrxiv/gs8yu/. In challenging our request, it was underlined several times by the Editor in Chief of BJSM that the “model” was presented as illustrative only, and this seems to make errors acceptable like if the editorials are a “safe zone” where for illustrative purposes it is possible to bend and even break scientific rules and methods, presenting models using unpublished and uncontrollable data.

    However, the reason of this communication is to warn the members of the consensus (and readers) that the ACWR model published in the IOC consensus(3) as a validated model has in fact not been validated at all: [page 1034] “The model has currently been validated through data from three different sports (Australian football, cricket and rugby league)(187)”. The reference 187 is one of the two editorials(1) for which we asked the retraction. So on one side the Editor in Chief insists that it is just an illustrative (flawed) model, but on the other side the same Editor in Chief, co-author (with one of the proponents of the model) of the IOC consensus wrote and published that it...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.