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Physical impairments in symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement: a systematic review of the evidence
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  • Published on:
    Methodological concerns in patients with femoroacetabular impingement: is ROM deficit really absent?
    • Davide B. Albertoni, Physical Therapist DINOGMI Department, Genova University, Genoa, Italy
    • Other Contributors:
      • Greta Castellini, Physical Therapist
      • Silvia Gianola, Physical Therapist

    We thank Freke et al. (1) for their systematic review about physical impairments in patients with symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement, nonetheless we have some remarks about methods and results of the article, in particular for range of motion (ROM) outcome.
    A meta-analysis of ROM was performed without reporting an overall estimate. Taking into account the amount of studies included and their information, a meta-analysis should have been accomplished. Nonetheless, authors concluded that individuals with symptomatic FAI demonstrated no difference in hip ROM in any direction of movement. This conclusion was unexpected taking into account the findings reported in the primary studies included), and in the previous systematic review published in 2015 (2), that showed instead a reduced ROM.
    This discrepancy in literature is already discussed by the Warwick agreement (3), where authors stated that “the evidence on hip range of motion (ROM) in FAI syndrome is surprisingly contradictory” due to contrasting published systematic reviews (1) (2).
    Therefore, we checked the accuracy of results reported, analyzing the data reported for every movement assessed in primary studies comparing those reported in this systematic review. We noted some issues in the represented forest plots.
    Firstly, some included studies (4), (5), (6), (7) were reported twice in the meta-analysis for different times points or reporting double data of the same patients obtained by two...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.