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P-97 Exertional heat stroke: case report
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  • Published on:
    No evidence for dehydration
    • James M Winger, Primary Care Sports Medicine Physician Loyola University Health System, Maywood IL

    This is a case of exertional heat stroke in which a young, experienced woman runner exerts herself and develops heat stroke. There is no effort to describe the patient's state of hydration besides indicating that she drank 250 mL prior to running (in what timeframe?) and that she drank 200mL after/during collapse. We are unaware of her weight and thus cannot even roughly calculate what her fluid deficit range may be after 90 minutes of running. We are unaware of her dress, which could lead to heat retention. Per figure 2, it appears that her blood pressure was approximately 110/70 at the time of collapse, which does not support hypovolemia. Values of BUN and creatinine are not presented that would have supported dehydration as a predisposing condition. Certainly in a road race there were other runners that reached her same level of hydration - why did they not suffer heat stroke?
    While this is a classically presented case of exertional heat stroke in a road race, there is insufficient evidence to associate it with dehydration.

    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.