Article Text

Download PDFPDF

Letter
Wearable, yes, but able…?: it is time for evidence-based marketing claims!
  1. Billy Sperlich1,
  2. Hans-Christer Holmberg2,3,4
  1. 1 Department of Sport Science, Integrative and Experimental Training Science, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
  2. 2 School of Kinesiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  3. 3 Department of Health Sciences, Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre, Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden
  4. 4 School of Sport Sciences, UiT Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway
  1. Correspondence to Professor Billy Sperlich, Department of Sport Science, Integrative and Experimental Training Science, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Judenbühlweg 11, Würzburg 97082, Germany; billy.sperlich{at}uni-wuerzburg.de

Statistics from Altmetric.com

With great interest, we1 have been following the growing popularity of non-invasive wearable sensor technology as a way to increase physical performance, assist recovery or monitor health. These sensors, integrated into clothing worn on the body, are often referred to as ‘wearables’ or ‘wearable technology’.

The popularity of the wearables is mainly due to three recent advances: (1) miniature sensor technology,1 (2) telemetric transfer and (web-based) storage of personal data and (3) extension of battery life. According to a worldwide survey of fitness trends, wearable technology appears set to be the number 1 trend in 2017,2 with expected sales for some wearables in the range of 1.5–2.6 billion US$.2

We believe that this type of technology will be a central tool in the fitness and health industry, provided some fundamental issues …

View Full Text

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.