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Does leisure time physical activity protect against low back pain? Systematic review and meta-analysis of 36 prospective cohort studies
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    RE: Does leisure time physical activity protect against low back pain? Systematic review and meta-analysis of 36 prospective cohort studies

    Shiri et al. conducted a meta-analysis to examine the effect of leisure time physical activity on non-specific low back pain (LBP) (1). Adjusted risk ratio (RR) (95% confidence interval) of moderately/highly active individuals, moderately active individuals and highly active individuals against individuals without regular physical activity for frequent/chronic LBP was 0.89 (0.82 to 0.97), 0.86 (0.79 to 0.94) and 0.84 (0.75 to 0.93), respectively. For LBP in the past 1-12 months, adjusted RR did not reach the level of significance in any levels of physical activity. The authors concluded that leisure time physical activity might reduce the risk of chronic LBP by 11%-16%. I have some concerns about their study by presenting negative information regarding protection of LBP by physical activity.

    First, Saragiotto et al. conducted a meta-analysis on the effectiveness of motor control exercise (MCE) in patients with nonspecific LBP (2). MCE focuses on the activation of the deep trunk muscles and targets the restoration of control and coordination of these muscles. They concluded that MCE was probably more effective than a minimal intervention for reducing pain, but did not have an important effect on disability, in patients with chronic LBP. In addition, there was no clear difference between MCE and other forms of exercises or manual therapy for acute and chronic LBP. Although there is no definite information to recommend MCE for non-specific LBP, further studies are need...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.