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Cervicovestibular rehabilitation following sport-related concussion
  1. Kathryn J Schneider1,2,3,
  2. Willem H Meeuwisse1,3,
  3. Karen M Barlow2,3,
  4. Carolyn A Emery1,2,3,4,5
  1. 1 Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  2. 2 Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute for Child and Maternal Health, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  3. 3 Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  4. 4 Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  5. 5 Department of Pediatrics, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  1. Correspondence to Dr Kathryn J Schneider, Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada; kjschnei{at}ucalgary.ca

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Dizziness, neck pain and headaches are commonly reported following a sport-related concussion and may persist.1 2 A combination of cervical and vestibular physiotherapy facilitates recovery following sport-related concussion in individuals with ongoing symptoms of dizziness, neck pain and headaches.3 In our randomised controlled trial (RCT), a higher proportion of individuals treated with multimodal physiotherapy were reported to be medically cleared to return to sport (within 8 weeks) than that of individuals who received a control intervention.4 However, the effect of timing of treatment is not currently known.

Here we share the results of the second phase of this RCT, which evaluated the efficacy of multimodal physiotherapy and vestibular rehabilitation compared with rest in individuals with persistent symptoms of dizziness, neck pain and/or headaches following a sport-related concussion. Individuals who had already completed an 8-week period of either multimodal physiotherapy …

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Footnotes

  • Contributors KJS, WHM and CAE contributed to the planning, conduct of analysis, interpretation and reporting of results. KMB contributed to the planning and reporting of results. All authors critically reviewed the final version of the research letter.

  • Funding This study was funded by the Alberta Centre for Child, Family and Community Research (equipment and physiotherapist assessment consultations). KJS was supported by an Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research studentship award at the time of this work. CAE was funded by a chair in paediatric rehabilitation funded by the Children’s Hospital Foundation (Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute for Child and Maternal Health). The Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre is one of the international research centres for prevention of injury and protection of athlete health supported by the International Olympic Committee.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Ethics approval Conjoint Health Research Ethics Board, University of Calgary.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

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