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‘More Walk and Less Talk’: Changing gender bias in sports medicine
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  • Published on:
    In response to: ‘More Walk and Less Talk’: Changing gender bias in sports medicine
    • Larissa Trease, Sport & Exercise Physician HREE School of Medicine, University of Tasmania
    • Other Contributors:
      • Rachel Harris, Sport & Exercise Physician
      • Philippa Inge, Sport & Exercise Physician
      • Louise Tulloh, Sport & Exercise Physician

    We applaud our Danish colleagues(1) on their recent paper on the #sportskongres experience prior to and following the seminal paper by Bekker(2) ‘We need to talk about manels: the problem of implicit gender bias in sport and exercise medicine’. We also congratulate their ongoing efforts to continue and advance the conversation and the opportunities for women in sport and exercise medicine.

    In February 2020, the Australasian College of Sport and Exercise Physicians (ACSEP) hosted our Annual Scientific Meeting in Canberra. Australia. For the first time we had gender equity in our presenters, for both the keynote (1/2) and general presentations (31/62). There were no manels and 47% (8/17) of our sessional chairs were female. This was an increased representation by women in comparison to our 2019 conference where 39% of our presenters were women.

    In a College where women comprise 25% of Fellows and 30% of Registrars, how did we achieve equal gender representation in our program? We looked for it, we planned for it, we invited women and we measured it and celebrated achieving it. The ACSEP currently has a female President and in 2020 the conference convenor was female. The conference committee had gender equity and the College has a Women in SEM committee that are responsible for the promotion of female Registrars and Fellows to leadership positions within the College and be a force for change within the overall culture of the college and the greater SEM l...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.