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International Olympic Committee consensus statement: methods for recording and reporting of epidemiological data on injury and illness in sport 2020 (including STROBE Extension for Sport Injury and Illness Surveillance (STROBE-SIIS))
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  • Published on:
    International Olympic Committee consensus statement: methods for recording and reporting of epidemiological data on injury and illness in sport 2020 (including STROBE Extension for Sport Injury and Illness Surveillance (STROBE-SIIS))

    Allow me to make use of the opportunity to extend my appreciation to the BJSM for being a publication of high standing, bringing cutting edge information to the sports medical fraternity.
    Thank you for the consensus statement of the International Olympic Committee describing the methods for recording and reporting of epidemiological data on injury and illness in sport 2020 (including STROBE Extension for Sport Injury and Illness Surveillance (STROBE-SIIS))”.[1] I found it both informative and useful.
    I have a comment about the use of the word “Nervous” in the first column of Table 5. It is an adjective whereas the rest of the words in the column are nouns that more accurately describe the tissue type under discussion. It is possibly only a linguistic error, but I am of the opinion that it should be “Nerve” or “Neural tissue”.

    Reference
    1. Bahr R, Clarsen B, Derman W, et al. International Olympic Committee consensus statement: methods for recording and reporting of epidemiological data on injury and illness in sport 2020 (including STROBE Extension for Sport Injury and Illness Surveillance (STROBE-SIIS)). Br J Sports Med Published Online First: 18 February 2020. doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2019-101969

    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Response to “International Olympic Committee consensus statement: methods for recording and reporting of epidemiological data on injury and illness in sport 2020 (including STROBE Extension for Sport Injury and Illness Surveillance (STROBE-SIIS))
    • Neil Gibson, PhD candidate 1 Centre for Medical and Exercise Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, Australia
    • Other Contributors:
      • Matthew Whalan, Physiotherapist and PhD candidate
      • John A Sampson, Senior Lecturer

    We read with interest the recent International Olympic Committee consensus statement: methods for recording and reporting of epidemiological data on injury and illness in sport 2020 (including STROBE Extension for Sport Injury and Illness Surveillance (STROBE-SIIS))”.[1] While helping to clarify aspects associated with recording and reporting epidemiological data, based on the definitions included in the statement, we believe that some of the examples in Table 10 require clarification with regards to the recording of injuries and calculation of time loss.

    Consider the example for ‘Delayed’ time loss: Sunday injury, thigh contusion, able to train on Monday and Tuesday but unable to train on Wednesday and returns on Sunday (time loss starts on Wednesday even though the injury was on Sunday). Time loss (days) 3. Given the recommended reported time loss of 3-days, and definition provided whereby “time-loss days should be counted from the day after the onset that the athlete is unable to participate”, we assume Wednesday is considered as the day of onset (day 0), with subsequent impact on Thursday, Friday and Saturday resulting in a 3-day time-loss (days). When considering this example, we were then somewhat confused by the example for, ‘Intermittent’ time loss: boy with Osgood-Schlatter disease that gets reported at the start of a training camp on Monday. The player may train fully on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, but miss training on Wednesday and Friday (time loss co...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.