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Emerging collaborative research platforms for the next generation of physical activity, sleep and exercise medicine guidelines: the Prospective Physical Activity, Sitting, and Sleep consortium (ProPASS)
  1. Emmanuel Stamatakis1,
  2. Annemarie Koster2,
  3. Mark Hamer3,4,
  4. Vegar Rangul5,
  5. I-Min Lee6,
  6. Adrian E Bauman1,7,
  7. Andrew J Atkin8,
  8. Mette Aadahl9,
  9. Charles E Matthews10,
  10. Paul Jarle Mork11,
  11. Lisa Askie12,
  12. Peter Cistulli13,
  13. Malcolm Granat14,
  14. Peter Palm15,
  15. Patrick Joseph Crowley16,
  16. Matthew Stevens16,
  17. Nidhi Gupta16,
  18. Anna Pulakka17,
  19. Sari Stenholm17,
  20. Daniel Arvidsson18,
  21. Gita Mishra19,
  22. Patrik Wennberg20,
  23. Sebastien Chastin21,22,
  24. Ulf Ekelund23,
  25. Andreas Holtermann16
  1. 1 Prevention Research Collaboration, Charles Perkins Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  2. 2 Department of Social Medicine, CAPHRI Care and Public Health Research Institute, Maastricht University, Maastricht, Limburg, The Netherlands
  3. 3 Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK
  4. 4 School of Sport Exercise and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK
  5. 5 Department of Public Health and Nursing, HUNT Research Centre, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
  6. 6 Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
  7. 7 Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
  8. 8 Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, School of Health Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK
  9. 9 Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Copenhagen, Denmark
  10. 10 Metabolic Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
  11. 11 Department of Public Health and Nursing, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
  12. 12 NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  13. 13 Sleep Research Group, Charles Perkins Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  14. 14 School of Health Sciences, University of Salford, Salford, UK
  15. 15 Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala Universitet, Uppsala, Sweden
  16. 16 National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark
  17. 17 Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland
  18. 18 Department of Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, Centre for Health and Performance, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
  19. 19 School of Public Health, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  20. 20 Family Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umea University, Umea, Sweden
  21. 21 School of Health and Life Science, Institute for Applied Health Research, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, UK
  22. 22 Department of Movement and Sports Sciences, Universiteit Gent, Gent, Belgium
  23. 23 Department of Sport Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway
  1. Correspondence to Emmanuel Stamatakis, Prevention Research Collaboration, Charles Perkins Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia; emmanuel.stamatakis{at}sydney.edu.au

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Galileo Galilei’s quote ‘measure what is measurable, and make measurable what is not so’ has particular relevance to health behaviours, such as physical activity (PA), sitting and sleep, whose measurement during free living is notoriously difficult. To date, much of what we know about how these behaviours affect our health is based on self-report by questionnaires which have limited validity, are prone to bias and inquire about selective aspects of these behaviours. Although self-reported evidence has made great contributions to shaping public health and exercise medicine policy and guidelines until now,1 the ongoing advancements of accelerometry-based measurement and evidence synthesis methods are set to change the landscape. The aim of this editorial is to outline new directions in PA and sleep-related epidemiology that open new horizons for guideline development and improvement; and to describe a new research collaboration platform: the Prospective Physical Activity, Sitting, and Sleep consortium (ProPASS) (figure 1).

Figure 1

Feasible research technology at scale, big consortia

Measurement technology used in epidemiology has made measurable what was not so until recently. Several population-based studies use accelerometers that are worn by participants for 24 hours a day for a whole week, offering unprecedented insights into the health attributes of PA, sitting and sleep. One of the most exciting aspects of accelerometers is that they show great promise for capturing nearly complete accounts of movement behaviour, including posture and activity type detection.2

However, advanced measurement methods and optimal evidence synthesis are not synonymous. Individual …

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