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Inforgraphic. Infographic and digital resources: the relationships between rugby union, and health and well-being
  1. Steffan A Griffin1,2,
  2. Nirmala Kanthi Panagodage Perera3,4,
  3. Andrew Murray1,5,
  4. Danny Glover6,
  5. Jennifer Duncan7,
  6. Samantha G Fawkner8,9,
  7. Simon PT Kemp2,10,
  8. Keith A Stokes2,11,
  9. Paul Kelly9,12
  1. 1 Centre for Sport and Exercise, University of Edinburgh Institute for Sport Physical Education and Health Sciences, Edinburgh, UK
  2. 2 Medical Services, Rugby Football Union, Twickenham, UK
  3. 3 Centre for Sport, Exercise and Osteoarthritis Research Versus Arthritis, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
  4. 4 Sports Medicine, Australian Institute of Sport, Belconnen, Australian Capital Territory, Australia
  5. 5 Sports Medicine, Scottish Rugby Union, Edinburgh, UK
  6. 6 Health Education Yorkshire and the Humber, Leeds, UK
  7. 7 Sport and Exercise, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
  8. 8 University of Edinburgh Institute for Sport Physical Education and Health Sciences, Edinburgh, UK
  9. 9 University of Edinburgh Physical Activity for Health Research Centre, Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
  10. 10 London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Faculty of Public Health and Policy, London, UK
  11. 11 Department for Health, University of Bath, Bath, UK
  12. 12 Physical Activity for Health Research Centre, University of Edinburgh Institute for Sport Physical Education and Health Sciences, Edinburgh, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Steffan A Griffin, Centre for Sport and Exercise, University of Edinburgh Institute for Sport Physical Education and Health Sciences, Edinburgh EH8 9YL, UK; steffangriffin{at}gmail.com

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Our scoping review was the first ‘big picture’ review to identify the relationships between rugby union, and health and well-being. Data suggest that all forms of rugby union (contact, non-contact and wheelchair) can provide moderate to vigorous physical activity, and can contribute to non-sedentary time, both of which have a raft of associated health and well-being benefits.1 National population surveys also consider rugby union as an activity that can provide muscle-strengthening/balance improvement when accrued for period of over 10 minutes,2 and ‘ball sports’ are generally considered to improve muscle function, bone health and balance.3

‘Non-contact’ …

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Footnotes

  • Twitter @SteffanGriffin, @nim_perera, @docandrewmurray, @drdannyglover2, @drsimonkemp, @drkeithstokes, @narrowboat_paul

  • Contributors SAG and AM proposed the infographic following acceptance of the scoping review into the BJSM. DG, SG, AM and JD produced the infographic and animation, and all authors subsequently reviewed and approved the final design and content.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests SAG receives remuneration for clinical work in professional rugby union, and is employed by the Rugby Football Union as a Sports Medicine Training Fellow. AM receives remuneration from Scottish Rugby Union for clinical work. SK is employed by the rugby football union as medical services director. KAS is employed by the rugby football union as medical research lead.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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