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Infographic. Recommendations for hamstring injury prevention in elite football: translating research into practice
  1. Matthew Buckthorpe1,2,3,
  2. Steve Wright4,
  3. Adam Virgile5,
  4. Mo Gimpel4
  1. 1 Faculty of Sport, Health and Applied Science, St Mary's University, Twickenham, London, UK
  2. 2 Education and Research Department, Isokinetic Medical Group, FIFA Medical Centre of Excellence, Bologna, Italy
  3. 3 Isokinetic Medical Group, FIFA Medical Centre of Excellence, London, UK
  4. 4 Southampton Football Club, Southampton, UK
  5. 5 College of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Matthew Buckthorpe, Faculty of Sport, Health and Applied Science, St Mary's University, Twickenham, London, UK; mbuckthorpe{at}hotmail.com

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Hamstring strain injuries (HSI) are consistently the most prevalent time-loss injury in football1 and as such are an important issue in football medicine. Despite an ever-increasing wealth of information emerging on the aetiology of HSIs, their incidence in football are increasing.1 This could be explained by the increased intensity and physical demands of football match play over the last decade2; but practitioners should also question their approach to injury prevention and physical preparation of players.

Within elite football, there is a large disconnect between evidence-based practice and the actual …

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