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Achilles tendon rupture: the evaluation and outcome of percutaneous and minimally invasive repair
  1. Michael R Carmont1,2
  1. 1 Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Princess Royal Hospital, Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital NHS Trust, Shropshire, UK
  2. 2 Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
  1. Correspondence to Mr Michael R Carmont, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Princess Royal Hospital, Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital NHS Trust, Shropshire, UK and Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden ; mcarmont{at}hotmail.com

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What did I do?

My thesis looked at optimising the outcome of patients following percutaneous and minimally invasive repair following Achilles tendon rupture.

Why did I do it?

Early studies on the management of Achilles tendon ruptures used complications as a primary outcome measure. Recent randomised controlled trials have shown no difference in patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) but patients are weaker after non-operative treatment compared with operative repair.

Following Achilles tendon rupture treated with percutaneous repair, the majority of patients have excellent/good outcome scores but many of these patients had alteration to the resting posture of the ankle joint, which may represent elongation of the Achilles tendon, causing the plantar flexion weakness (figure 1). I wanted to investigate this.

Figure 1

This police officer returned to active duty and competitive recreational netball reporting an Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score of 97 points at 12 months following operative …

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