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Bright spots, physical activity investments that work—Gators in Motion: a holistic approach to sport-based youth development
  1. Trevor Bopp,
  2. E Paul Roetert
  1. Department of Tourism, Recreation and Sport Management, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Trevor Bopp, Department of Tourism, Recreation and Sport Management, University of Florida, Gainesville FL 32611, USA; tbopp{at}ufl.edu

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Programme card

  • Country/locality/coverage:

    • Gainesville, Florida, USA, has a population of approximately 130 000.

  • Target population:

    • Youth from Southeast Gainesville who are underserved, under-resourced and living in marginalised communities.

  • What modes/types/domains of physical activity does the programme promote?

    • Tennis is the primary sport of focus but the programme’s all-inclusive approach to physical literacy development allows for a variety of other sports and physical activities.

  • Which of the seven best investments does the programme address?

    • Health education.

    • Public education.

    • Whole-of-community approach.

    • Sports and recreation.

  • What sectors does it involve?

    • Education, health, community well-being, character and life skills, and physical activity.

  • Estimated programme reach:

    • Gators in Motion’s parent organisation, Aces in Motion, has served over 450 youth in the Gainesville community.

  • What is special about this programme?

    • It integrates academic enrichment, character and life skills, and physical literacy and health programming towards a holistic development of youth participants.

  • Key contact (name, position, email)

    • Trevor Bopp, Assistant Professor, tbopp@ufl.edu

  • Programme website and/or Twitter/Facebook handle

    • Email: https://www.acesinmotion.org/gatorsinmotion

    • Twitter: @acesinmotion

    • Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/acesinmotion

Background and programme overview

Across the USA, disparities closely linked with race and socioeconomic status (SES) exist such that physical, health and educational outcomes associated with youth development are negatively impacted for children and adolescents from underserved, marginalised communities. For instance, regular physical activity has been found to increase physical …

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