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Infographic. One small step for man, one giant leap for men’s health: a meta-analysis of behaviour change interventions to increase men’s physical activity
  1. Paul Sharp1,
  2. John C Spence2,
  3. Joan L Bottorff3,4,
  4. John L Oliffe5,6,
  5. Kate Hunt7,
  6. Mathew Vis-Dunbar8,
  7. Adam Virgile9,
  8. Cristina M Caperchione1
  1. 1School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  2. 2Sedentary Living Lab, Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
  3. 3Institute for Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Prevention, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada
  4. 4School of Nursing, The University of British Columbia, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada
  5. 5School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  6. 6Department of Nursing, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  7. 7Institute for Social Marketing and Health, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK
  8. 8Library, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada
  9. 9College of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont, USA
  1. Correspondence to Paul Sharp, School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2007, Australia; paul.sharp{at}uts.edu.au

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Health promotion programmes focused on improving physical activity have traditionally failed to engage and retain men,1 resulting in under-represented outcomes and challenges with generalisability.2 Recent interest and developments in men’s health research have led to an increased number of interventions specifically targeted at engaging and retaining men.3 In our recent systematic review and meta-analysis,4 published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, we aimed to determine the effects of behaviour change interventions on men’s physical activity and to identify potential moderators of intervention effectiveness (eg, theoretical underpinning, gender-tailored, contact frequency). Study findings are summarised below and in the accompanying …

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Footnotes

  • Twitter @paulgsharp, @adamvirgile

  • Contributors PS wrote the draft. AV designed the infographic. All authors provided feedback on the draft and infographic design.

  • Funding PS is supported by an Australian Government Research Training Programme Scholarship. JO is supported by a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Men’s Health Promotion.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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