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Infographic. Does foot mobility affect the outcome in the management of patellofemoral pain with foot orthoses versus hip exercises? A randomised clinical trial
  1. Mark Matthews1,2,
  2. Michael Skovdal Rathleff3,4,5,
  3. Andrew Philip Claus2,6,
  4. Tom McPoil7,
  5. Robert Nee8,
  6. Kay M Crossley9,
  7. Jessica Kasza10,
  8. Bill T Vicenzino2
  1. 1School of Sport, Ulster University, Belfast, UK
  2. 2School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  3. 3Department of Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark
  4. 4SMI, Department of Health Science and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Aalborg Universitet, Aalborg, Denmark
  5. 5Department of Clinical Medicine, Center for General Practice in Aalborg, Aalborg, Denmark
  6. 6Professor Tess Cramond Multidisciplinary Pain Centre, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  7. 7School of Physical Therapy, Regis University, Denver, Colorado, USA
  8. 8School of Physical Therapy, Pacific University, Hillsboro, Oregon, USA
  9. 9La Trobe University—Bundoora Campus, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  10. 10Clinical Epidemiology at Cabrini, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Professor Bill T Vicenzino, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD 4072, Australia; b.vicenzino{at}uq.edu.au

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Background

Patellofemoral pain affects 23%–29% of adolescent and the general population, with one in two reporting persistent symptoms 5–8 years later.1 Patellofemoral pain is considered a multifactorial condition with underlying biomechanical, neuromuscular and/or psychological contributors.2 3 Foot orthoses and hip exercises are recommended for the management of patellofemoral pain.4 Clinically, the quandary is to determine (1) which individual’s presenting characteristic(s) may help guide which treatment to prioritise and (2) which treatment is best in the early stages of management, irrespective of presenting characteristics.

Evidence suggests that greater foot mobil ity (defined as a change of 11 mm or more in midfoot width when moving from non-weight bearing to weight bearing) is associated with better outcomes following foot orthoses.5 Crucially, methodological considerations in previous literature, such …

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Footnotes

  • Twitter @Mark_MatthewsNZ, @Bill_Vicenzino

  • Contributors MM contributed to the study conception and design, recruitment of participants, management of study proceedings, data collection and drafting and revision of the manuscript. APC, TM, RN and KMC contributed to the study conception and design, and drafting and revision of the manuscript. MSR contributed to the study design, recruitment of participants, management of study proceedings, data collection and reviewed the manuscript. JK contributed to the statistical analysis and reviewed the manuscript. BTV contributed to the study conception and design, recruitment of participants, data management and the drafting and revision of the manuscript. BTV and MM act as guarantors to affirm that this manuscript is an honest, accurate and transparent account of the study being reported; that no important aspects of the study have been omitted and that any discrepancies from the study as planned (and, if relevant, registered) have been explained. The corresponding author attests that all listed authors meet authorship criteria and that no others meeting the criteria have been omitted.

  • Funding National Health and Medical Research Council (Ref: 631717).

  • Competing interests BTV reports grants from Commonwealth of Australia National Health and Medical Research Council (Ref: 631717) and from Vionics International for this research. MM is supported by an Australian Postgraduate Award. BTV and TM are voluntary (non-compensated) members by invitation on the Vasyli Think Tank.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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