Article Text

Download PDFPDF
Infographic. Running Myth: recreational running causes knee osteoarthritis
  1. James L N Alexander1,2,
  2. Richard W Willy3,
  3. Adam G Culvenor1,
  4. Christian J Barton1,4,5
  1. 1La Trobe Sport and Exercise Medicine Research Centre, School of Allied Health, Human Services and Sport, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia
  2. 2Evado Studios Nelson Bay, Nelson Bay, New South Wales, Australia
  3. 3Physical Therapy and Movement Science, University of Montana, Missoula, Montana, USA
  4. 4Department of Physiotherapy, Podiatry and Prosthetics and Orthotics, School of Allied Health, Human Services and Sport, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia
  5. 5Department of Surgery, St Vincent’s Hospital, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Mr James L N Alexander, La Trobe Sport and Exercise Research Centre, School of Allied Health, Human Services and Sport, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia; j.alexander{at}latrobe.edu.au

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Running is often perceived as bad for your knees.1 In particular, concern exists regarding the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis due to long-term exposure to running.1

Despite these fears, recreational running does not have negative consequences on knee joint articular cartilage in runners without symptomatic knee osteoarthritis2 3 and may actually be beneficial for long-term joint health4 (see figure 1). Only 3.5% (95% CI 3.4% to 3.6%) of recreational (amateur) runners have osteoarthritis (knee or hip) compared with 10.2% (95% CI 9.9% to 10.6%) of sedentary individuals.4 However, a dose–response relationship may be present; 13.3% (95% CI 11.6% to 15.2%) of elite or ex-elite runners (competitive professional athletes of an international level) had osteoarthritis, a higher rate than seen in recreational …

View Full Text

Footnotes

  • Twitter @JamesA_15, @rwilly2003, @agculvenor, @DrChrisBarton

  • Contributors JLNA and CJB conceived the idea. JLNA led development of the infographic and accompanying text. All authors contributed and approved the final infographic and accompanying text.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests CJB is a deputy editor and AGC is an associate editor of BJSM.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.