Article Text

Download PDFPDF
Association of in-competition injury risk and the degree of rapid weight cutting prior to competition in division I collegiate wrestlers
  1. Erin Hammer1,
  2. Jennifer L Sanfilippo2,
  3. Gary Johnson3,
  4. Scott Hetzel4
  1. 1Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA
  2. 2Badger Athletic Performance, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA
  3. 3Division of Intercollegiate Athletics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA
  4. 4Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Erin Hammer, Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53705, USA; ehammer{at}uwhealth.org

Abstract

Objectives Weight cutting is thought to offer a competitive advantage in wrestling. Dehydration has deleterious effects on physical and cognitive function, which may increase the risk of injury. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether the degree of weight cutting was associated with injury risk.

Methods Data were collected prospectively in a cohort of collegiate wrestlers over seven seasons. Changes in weight, body fat and lean mass were measured during the preseason, at midseason and before competition. Cox proportional-hazard ratios were calculated for risk of in-competition injury.

Results Among 67 unique division 1 collegiate wrestlers (163 athlete seasons), there were 53 unique injuries affecting 46 athletes. There was no difference in absolute weight change, per cent weight change, per cent body fat change or per cent lean mass change between injured and non-injured wrestlers from the preseason to midseason measurements. From midseason to competition weight, change in body weight was −7.0%±3.2% (−5.3 kg±2.6) in injured athletes compared with −5.7%±3.3% (−4.3 kg±2.5) in non-injured athletes. For every kilogram of body weight lost, wrestlers had a 14% increased hazard of injury (HR 1.14, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.25, p=0.004). For every 1% of body weight lost, wrestlers had an 11% increased hazard of injury (HR 1.11, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.19, p=0.005).

Conclusion Rapid weight cutting was associated with a higher risk of in-competition injuries in division 1 collegiate wrestlers. For every per cent in body weight lost, wrestlers had an 11% increased hazard of injury during competition.

  • weight loss
  • dehydration
  • athletic injuries
  • risk factor
  • body composition

Data availability statement

Data are available on reasonable request.

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.

Data availability statement

Data are available on reasonable request.

View Full Text

Footnotes

  • Twitter @HammerWisco

  • Contributors EH, JLS, GJ and SH participated in the design and conception of the study. EH, JLS and GJ were responsible for data collection. SH performed the data analysis and table designs. EH drafted the manuscript and all the authors revised it critically and gave their approval of the final version. EH is the study guarantor.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient and public involvement Patients and/or the public were not involved in the design, or conduct, or reporting, or dissemination plans of this research.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.