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Infographic. Field-based methods for assessing exercise intensity in adults with spinal cord injury
  1. Victoria L Goosey-Tolfrey1,
  2. Mike Hutchinson1,
  3. Lesley Sharpe1,2
  1. 1School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, The Peter Harrison Centre for Disability Sport, Loughborough University, Leics, UK
  2. 2School of Sport and Exercise, University of Lincoln, Lincoln, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Victoria L Goosey-Tolfrey, School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, Loughborough University, Leics LE11 3TU, UK; v.l.tolfrey{at}lboro.ac.uk

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Physical inactivity is recognised to be an important determinant of increased cardiometabolic risk and cardiovascular disease in adults with spinal cord injury (SCI). Normal everyday activities are not enough to maintain cardiovascular fitness and exercise should include aerobic exercise, strength training and flexibility. To promote health, adults with SCI are encouraged to exercise at a ‘moderate to vigorous intensity’.1 Exercise can be in the form of cardiovascular exercise at home or in a gym (eg, arm ergometry), or playing a sport such as wheelchair basketball. Whatever is chosen, it is important that the individual be guided by a method that is suited to …

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Footnotes

  • Twitter @PHC_Lboro

  • Contributors VLG-T and MH were both involved in the concept of this infographic messages. LS led the main design of the infographic, while all authors finalised the infographic with input from the end-users during the process.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.