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Methods for recording and reporting of epidemiological data on injury and illness in sport: ReFORM synthesis of the International Olympic Committee consensus statement
  1. Pascal Edouard1,2,
  2. Camille Tooth3,4,5
  1. 1Inter-university Laboratory of Human Movement Biology (EA 7424), University Jean Monnet Saint-Etienne, Lyon 1, Université Savoie Mont-Blanc, Saint-Etienne, France
  2. 2Department of Clinical and Exercise Physiology, Sports Medicine Unit, University Hospital of Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne, France
  3. 3Department of Physical Medicine, Rehabilitation and Sports Traumatology, SportS², FIFA Medical Centre of Excellence, FIMS Collaborative Centre of Sports Medicine, CHU de Liège, Liège, Belgium
  4. 4Department of Physical Activity and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium
  5. 5ReFORM IOC Research Centre for Prevention of Injury and Protection of Athlete Health, Liège, Belgium
  1. Correspondence to Prof Pascal Edouard, University Hospital of Saint-Etienne, SAINT-ETIENNE, France; Pascal.Edouard{at}univ-st-etienne.fr

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Introduction

Epidemiological studies through injury and illness surveillance and data collection are fundamental to protect athlete health. To encourage consistency in definitions and methodology, and to allow for data comparison between studies, consensus statements have been published in various sports. The aim of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) consensus by Bahr et al1 on methods for collecting and reporting epidemiological data on injuries and illnesses in sport was (1) to further strengthen consistency in data collection, injury definitions and research reporting through an updated set of recommendations for studying injuries and illnesses in sports, and (2) to provide practical guidance to researchers and clinicians on how to plan, conduct data collection and communicate findings. The ReFORM IOC Research Centre2 first summarised and translated the consensus statement into a shorter synopsis in French to facilitate broader use by French-speaking researchers.3 4 In this Editorial, we provide this summary to highlight key areas from the IOC consensus on methods for collecting and reporting epidemiological data on injuries and illnesses in sport1 (figure 1).

Figure 1

Infographic of the ReFORM synthesis of the International Olympic Committee consensus statement on methods for recording and reporting of epidemiological data on injury and illness in sport.

Definitions and classifications of health problems

The definition of an athlete’s health problem was derived from the WHO’s definition, and is …

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Footnotes

  • X @https://x.com/PascalEdouard42, @https://x.com/ToothCamille

  • Contributors PE and CT wrote the synthesis. All authors understand that they are accountable for all aspects of the work and ensure the accuracy or integrity of this manuscript. PE is the guarantor of the manuscript.

  • Funding This work has been financially supported by the International Olympic Committee Medical and Scientific Commission programme for Prevention of injury and protection of athlete health (IOC Research Centres).

  • Competing interests None declared.

    PE is an Associate Editor for the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; internally peer reviewed.