Article Text

Download PDFPDF
How race and socioeconomic status moderate the association between moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and depressive symptoms: a cross-sectional study with compositional data
  1. Yujie Liu1,2,
  2. Xin Ge1,2,
  3. Ying Wang1,
  4. Shan Qiao3,
  5. Yong Cai1,2
  1. 1Public Health Department, Hongqiao International Institute of Medicine, Tongren Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine Shanghai, Shanghai, China
  2. 2School of Public Health, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China
  3. 3Department of Health Promotion, Education and Behavior, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA
  1. Correspondence to Professor Yong Cai, Public Health Department, Hongqiao International Institute of Medicine, Tongren Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine Shanghai, Shanghai, China; Caiyong202028{at}hotmail.com; Professor Shan Qiao, Department of Health Promotion, Education and Behavior, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, United States; Shanqiao{at}mailbox.sc.edu

Abstract

Objectives This study explored how race and socioeconomic status (SES) moderated the association between moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and depressive symptoms with compositional data.

Methods Participants were 2803 US adults from the 2005–2006 cycle of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Accelerometers were used to measure MVPA, light-intensity physical activity (LPA) and sedentary behaviours (SB). Participants self-reported sleep duration and depressive symptoms. SES was derived by latent class analysis using household income level, education attainment and occupation. The association between the relative time of MVPA and depressive symptoms and the moderating effects of race and SES were investigated through compositional data analysis. Isotemporal substitution analysis was employed to estimate the association of time reallocation from other movement behaviours to MVPA with depressive symptoms.

Results Increased time spent in MVPA relative to time spent in LPA, SB and sleep was inversely associated with depressive symptoms (OR (95% CI)=0.679 (0.538–0.855)). The relative time of MVPA significantly interacted with race and SES for depressive symptoms (P for interaction <0.05). Reallocating 10–30 min from sleep, SB or LPA to MVPA was associated with lower odds of depressive symptoms solely among non-Hispanic white individuals and those with higher SES.

Conclusion This study used compositional data to reveal a reverse association between MVPA and depressive symptoms among white individuals and those with higher SES. Our results provide evidence of how race and SES moderate the relationship between MVPA and depressive symptoms. Future research is needed to further explore these racial and socioeconomic differences.

  • Physical activity
  • Depression

Data availability statement

Data are available in a public, open access repository. The datasets are available from the NHANES databases (Available from https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes/index.htm).

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.

Data availability statement

Data are available in a public, open access repository. The datasets are available from the NHANES databases (Available from https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes/index.htm).

View Full Text

Footnotes

  • Contributors Conceptualisation, methodology and funding acquisition: YC. Data curation: YL and XG. Formal analysis: YL and YW. Writing—original draft: YL and XG. Writing—review and editing: SQ and YC. YL is guarantor of this study. All authors have read and agreed to the published version of the manuscript.

  • Funding This study was funded by the Key discipline projects of Shanghai Three-Year Action Plan for Public Health under Grant (GWVI-11.1-29) and Science and Technology Commission Shanghai Municipality (No. 20JC1410204).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient and public involvement Patients and/or the public were not involved in the design, or conduct, or reporting, or dissemination plans of this research.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.