eLetters

90 e-Letters

published between 2004 and 2007

  • Learning from the lower extremity?
    Karsten Knobloch

    Dear editor,

    I read with great interest the recent review focussing the pathophysiology, the diagnosis and the treatment of tennis elbow. However, based on this report I would appreciate having the chance to comment on some issues raised by the authors shortly.

    Diagnosis: The role of neovascularisation determined by colour or even better by Power Doppler sonography has been mentioned for several sites...

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  • Application of the Laws of Rugby Union
    Henare R Broughton

    Dear Editor

    What is important is that coaches must apply the Laws when coaching the game. Referees however must apply the Laws when refereeing at any level of competition. At the Rugby World Cup the post tackle events and the ruck were consistently poorly refereed. Only the tackled player and the tackler(s) are permitted to be off their feet and no one else. In the matter of the scrum that Law prohibits the front rows f...

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  • Role of the Coaching in Preventing Injuries
    Henare Broughton

    Dear Editor

    Despite the measures you have outlined athletes even of the age group you are referring still get injured. Of the measures you have highlighted I believe is only a part of the strategies to injury in sport. In rugby union a study by Chalmers et al (2004)[1] were of the view that coaches had a significant role to preventing injuries, although there has been no study to address that issue it would seem that ou...

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  • Comment on Clinghan et al.
    Colin A Walker

    Dear editor

    Re:Do you get value for money when you buy an expensive pair of running shoes? [1]

    When the ground-force-reaction is measured as a function of time during running or walking, the result is a function of speed and underfoot conditions [2]. At any speed, however, the area under the force-time plot represents the total momentum change during the stance phase of gait. This cannot be altered by any...

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  • Response to subjects tested
    Brad J Davidson

    Dear editor

    Being that women are 6-10 times more likely to suffer from knee injuries or anterior knee pain, perhaps clinical significance would be improved if mainly females were tested.

  • Poor play on Centre Court
    Jan M Bjordal

    Dear editor

    In the last issue of the journal, a review of tennis elbow and its management in tennis players appears. It is disappointing to see that the journal publishes a review with misleading treatment recommendations. The review article suffers from the inherent weaknesses of the narrative review form with an unjustified favourisation of "promising" pharmacological and surgical interventions. Physical inte...

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  • Could anabolic steroids induce micronuclei in buccal cells?
    Armen K. Nersesyan

    Dear Editor,

    I read the paper by Torres-Bugarin et al with great interest. Unfortunately, anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are frequently used in professional, and even in amateur sports. Hence, the aim of the study is very important. But before final decision concerning genotoxic activity of AAS, studied by means of micronucleus (MN) assay exfoliated buccal cells, some very important points of the paper must be...

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  • ACTN3 was never ‘the’ gene for speed
    Stephen M. Roth

    Dear Editor,

    Lucia and colleagues [1] recently reported a case study in which a Spanish elite long jumper was identified as being α-actinin-3 deficient, owing to carrying the X/X genotype of the R577X polymorphism in the ACTN3 gene. The authors suggest that the case provides a “notable” exception to the idea that ACTN3 represents “the ‘gene for speed’,” taking out of context a question posed in a recent review b...

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  • Mechanisms of non-contact ACL injuries
    Timothy E Hewett, PhD

    Dear Dr. McCrory,

    We are writing to comment on, Mechanisms of non-contact ACL injuries, by Yu and Garrett [Yu and Garrett (2007)]. Through what we consider to be a less than comprehensive review, the authors conclude that “valgus” could not be a mechanism associated with ACL rupture and therefore imply that it is not important to incorporate methods to prevent valgus loading into neuromuscular training programs...

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  • Comment regarding Hegedus et al and comparing investigations into OST's
    Rod J Whiteley

    Dear Editor

    Firstly I think the authors of this article are to be congratulated for condensing a significant amount of information to a digestible article of interest to clinicians and investigators alike. The investigators point out that many examination techniques fail to repeat the initial success of their investigation during subsequent study by other authors. One aspect of this oft-cited point which has evaded...

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