eLetters

116 e-Letters

published between 2006 and 2009

  • Negating the safety advantage in running shoe design: perceived risk affecting performance?
    Tony H. Reinhardt-Rutland

    Dear Editor,

    Richards et al (2009) refer to a popular running shoe design entailing a heightened sole and pronation control. It is claimed to reduce running injuries, but in fact no evidence has been obtained to show that the design actually achieves its purpose.

    May I add another thought on this topic? In a number of areas of human activity - most notably, with regard to behaviour on the roads whether as mo...

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  • More science please
    Justin A Paoloni

    Dear Editor

    I read with interest the Consensus Statement on Concussion, and believe this worthwhile in furthering scientific knowledge on concussion in sport. However, I have concerns about definitive comments in the consensus statement, given the lack of supporting scientific evidence. Whilst this consensus document is only “a guide and is of a general nature consistent with the reasonable practice of a healthcare...

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  • Desk work in the Activity Point System
    Marie-Eve Mathieu

    Dear Editor

    It is with great interest that I read the article by Ehrsam and collaborators in which they proposed an innovative way of increasing the exercise practice of overweight and obese individuals. [1] The system they developed attributes points to activities based on the modality and intensity of the activity, the body mass index (BMI) and the body weight of the individual. For example, an individual wit...

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  • Exercise and health
    fergus joseph dignan

    Dear Editor

    I very much enjoyed reading the 'warm up' article by Steven N Blair in the January edition of BJSM. The first study that he quoted on attributable fractions for all cause deaths was a real eye popper!

    I was very surprised to see that low cardiorespiratory fitness was a greater attributable risk factor (in both sexes) than obesity, smoking, high cholesterol, and diabetes, as well as hypertensio...

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  • Left-handed advantage: an alternative explanation
    Daniel C Lane

    Dear Editor

    Gursoy’s paper, “Effects of left- or right-hand preference on the success of boxers in Turkey”, is an interesting and important addition to the research literature on the effect of handedness in sport. However, we believe that the explanation of the cause of the advantage of left-handedness is misleading and needs correction.

    Gursoy attributes the superior performance of left-handed boxers to...

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  • How long to jump again ?
    Fulvio Stradijot

    Dear Editor

    I work in the rehab field by 18 years with a direct experience of ACL rehabs of more than 600 cases. It's absolutely normal that after 60 days people can't jump like before surgery. In my experience, I use testing ACL patients, first time ,after 90 days from surgery for side to side impairment with isokinetic, electronic balance board and jump test with optic fiber. Often in the first two tests we fin...

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  • Re: Separating fatness from lack of fitness - authors reply
    Bethany B. Barone

    Dear Editor,

    The use of absolute versus weight standardized maximal oxygen consumption during fitness testing has been debated, especially in the context of intervention trials that may induce weight change. We recently showed that exercise training-related changes in exercise systolic blood pressure (SBP) were independently predicted by changes in fatness (by waist circumference) and fitness (by VO2...

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  • another view, another challenge forLBP
    Bernard Liew

    Dear editor,

    I read with great interest the latest editorial on the role Transversus Abdominis (TrA) has on lumbar stability [Hodges, 2008]. The role of muscles that contribute to stability has been a matter of great controversy. This controversy, in my opinion, stems from the fact that different school of thoughts espouses their opinions in subtle ways that sway readers in directions that ultimately lead to misin...

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  • Response to Gursoy R - Br J Sports Med. 2009; 43:142-144
    Massimiliano Bianco

    Dear Editor,

    I read with interest the recent article published in this journal about the left-handedness in boxing and the proclivity to success.[1] As Gursoy quotes in his paper, the rate of left-handedness in the general population ranges between 1 and 30% in different studies, but the body of medical sports literature on this topic is very small. If we consider the actual World Boxing Council (WBC) title-holders...

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  • Separating fatness from lack of fitness
    Roy J. Shephard

    Dear Editor

    In many practical situations such as the treatment of hypertension, it is important to determine whether an improvement of condition following exercise prescription is due to an increase in aerobic fitness, or whether it simply reflects a reduction in body fat content.[1] A previous review of 61 studies of training-induced changes in resting blood pressure[2] concluded that any reduction in resting pressures...

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