eLetters

337 e-Letters

  • Examination of resuscitaion skills
    Arturo Lupoli

    Dear Editor

    Lavis et al [1] seek to explain the poor results obtained by candidates undertaking the Bath University diploma in sports and exercise medicine as a failure of the candidate to take the subject seriously. They expect the standard to be comparable to “that required of a candidate completing the same task on an ATLS, PHTLS or ALS course.”

    A candidate undertaking any of the above courses, or a...

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  • Universal Use
    C. Jason McKnight

    Dear Editor

    I congratulate you for researching the importance of appropriate soccer ball size. Your article on distal radial fractures was cited in The New York Times shortly after being published, shedding light on a potentially preventible injury in soccer. It seems possible that if children just played with junior-sized balls, fewer would get hurt by distal radial fractures. I would like to add some...

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  • Sports doctors' first aid skills
    Paul Schur
    Dear Editor,

    I cannot resist the temptation to join the debate on sports doctors’ resuscitation skills [1,2]. The study by Thompson et al [3] suggested that there is a perceived need amongst Sports specialists for first aid skills. However I received no response to my letter concerning this, [4] which indirectly posed the question, ‘should doctors who attend aquatic sports be able to deal with a suspected cervical...

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  • Further points about stretching
    P E Schur

    Editor,

    I would like to thank Dr Shrier for his letter and make a couple of comments in reply.

    First, I would like to emphasise the point I was making in my original letter. When discussing an ill-defined procedure, as exemplified by 'stretching', it is important to be precise about what is being done to what, when and for how long for comparisons to be made or for valid debate to proceed.

    S...

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  • The authors respond
    D M Wright

    Editor,

    Thanks to David Humphries for his comments on our paper. We agree that our respondents may have overestimated the time they spent leading and bouldering (L&B) in comparison with top-roping (TR), though if this is the case we should ask why. Bravado, perhaps wishing to appear bolder than they actually are, or memory error seem the most likely explanations. Memory error, resulting...

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  • Re: Sports Medicine Training in the United States
    Walter W Curl
    Dear Editor,

    The article "Sports Medicine Training in the United States" (Br. J. Sports Med. 2000; 34: 410-412) was recently referred to our attention. We applaud the Journal's interest in improving the public's understanding of this complex area, but we are distressed over a number of serious misstatements related to orthopaedic sports medicine training.

    First, the author states that orthopaedic sports medicine f...

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  • Flexibility versus stretching
    Ian Shrier

    Dear Editor,

    Dr. Schur brings up an apparent discrepancy between my article that stretching does not prevent injury, and Dr. Reid's article that stretching may be beneficial in rowers. This is an apparent discrepancy for two reasons. My review of the literature discussed stretching immediately before exercise and not stretching in general. To my knowledge, there have only been two studies on stretching at times oth...

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  • Proportions of activities in a climbing gym
    David Humphries
    Dear Editor,

    Firstly thanks to the authors for adding some valuable information to the under researched area of indoor climbing injuries (particularly given the popularity of this activity world wide).

    Whilst I have no doubt that many of your participants put leading or bouldering as the activity which they spent most time doing whilst in the gym I would have significant doubts that that is actually the case, p...

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  • Management of diabetes at high altitude
    Conxita Leal

    Dear Editor,

    In response to the letter of Moore et al [1], we would like to report the results obtained in 8 type I diabetic mountaineers who ascended the Aconcagua (6950m) [2] without significant medical problems. The only climber unable to make the summit reached 6700m because of a problem not related to diabetes.

    None of the climbers took any drug to prevent Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS), because of...

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  • Re: Reassessing the need for sport diving medicals
    Stephen Glen

    Authors' Reply:

    The main conclusions of our paper were that no significant unexpected abnormalities were found on clinical examination of divers in the Scottish Sub-Aqua Club, and that the questionnaire was the important part of the screening assessment of divers. This remains the case regardless of how the information is analysed.

    In response to the questions raised by Philip Smith, only 391 divers re...

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