eLetters

383 e-Letters

  • Cardiovascular adaptation in hypoxia
    Erdem Kasikcioglu

    Dear Editor

    I read with great interest the recently published study by Shave et al.[1] in the February, 2004 issue of the British Journal of Sports Medicine. The authors found that exercise training in hypoxic environment did not affect cardiac systolic and diastolic functions. However, it is known that the characteristics of the study population (broad age range, aerobic exercise capacity) may cause significantl...

    Show More
  • Lots of good sports not a lot of good sports to play them
    Richard Clarke Cobey

    Dear Editor

    I must fully concur with Dr McCrory's assessment of youth sport. Here in the US, we have a great many fathers find enjoyment in coaching their children-however there are far more whom become engulfed in the desire to win at all cost, pushing their children, dramatizing local saturday morning football as if it were the Super Bowl or World Cup. I find it highly objectionable to their behavior and the role...

    Show More
  • Re: Exercise induced compartment syndrome in a professional footballer
    Mike R Barnes

    Dear Editor

    There are a number of interesting points raised by this case report, as well as some fundamental and misleading errors.

    I would be very interested to know what the authors actually mean by the term “shin splints”

    They state that “Exercise-induced compartment syndrome is the least common” (cause of lower leg pain). Perhaps exercise-induced acute compartment syndromes are very rare, bu...

    Show More
  • Authors' Reply: chiropractic spinal manipulation for back pain
    E Ernst

    Dear Editor

    McCarthy, Byfield [1] and Breen [2] make a number of comments which require a brief reply. I wrote the article on this specific subject because I was invited to do so by the British Journal of Sports Medicine. All three correspondents seem to oppose my "long track record" of writing about adverse effects of spinal manipulation. I do this simply because it is my job. I try to apply the rules of science to al...

    Show More
  • Observations concerning chiropractic spinal manipulation for back pain a reply
    Peter W. McCarthy

    Dear Editor

    We found the leader by Professor Ernst (Br J Sports Med 2003;37:195-196) to be rather disjointed, out of date and potentially misleading. This is particularly evident in the initial paragraph. The author begins by generally addressing sports medicine clinicians, including those who are trained in mobilisation and manipulation, namely osteopaths, physiotherapists and chiropractors and a...

    Show More
  • The "war" on chiropractors
    Alan C Breen

    Dear Editor

    The Ernst and Sran commentary [1] about 'chiropractic manipulation' is not consistent with the majority of systematic reviews, nor national guidelines. It is, however, highly consistent with the previous and prolific writings of the first author himself on this topic. Surely, the significance of this pattern is an obvious one, and the suggestion that if anyone else but a chiropractor performs a ma...

    Show More
  • Response to: Endurance in young athletes: it can be trained
    Ralph Beneke

    Dear Editor

    With regard to the Leader by ADG Baxter-Jones and N Maffulli [1] we would like to extend our appreciation to the authors for their interest in this never ending “hot debate”.

    The authors clearly point out difficulties and potential pitfalls of exercise testing, exercise prescription and the interpretation of acute responses and of the chronic adaptation to exercise training during growth and ma...

    Show More
  • Cardiovascular preparticipation screening
    Fabio Pigozzi

    Dear Editor

    The presence of false positive ECGs is without doubt a limit to the diagnostic capability of this investigation in the contest of cardiovascular screening of athletes. These abnormal ECG appearances result mainly from the morphological adaptations of the heart to training and to the actual sport practised. For example, endurance athletes show a higher rate of ECG abnormalities than athletes practising ‘tec...

    Show More
  • Cardiovascular screening of athletes: a unique opportunity for an epidemiological experiment
    Roy J. Shephard

    Dear Editor

    The Italian requirement that all professional and amateur athletes obtain medical certification of their ability to participate in their chosen sport dates from 1950.[1] In 1971 and 1982 this mandate was reinforced by specific legislation of the Italian Ministry of Health, covering both competitive and non-competitive participants.[2] Consequently, large numbers of symptom-free and ostensibly health...

    Show More
  • Pseudo science
    Ralf Milke

    Dear Editor

    Does BJSM even use its review process? Being a runner and running trainer and scientist, I am embarrased about this article.[1] The news *running is unhealthy* quickly went the round. Here in Germany it already was in TV text, in several online newspapers (with headlines like 'Run into Osteoporosis'), and has reached internet discussion boards. It will supposedly appear in printed matter starting tomorro...

    Show More

Pages