eLetters

116 e-Letters

published between 2006 and 2009

  • Measuring exercise performance
    fergus joseph dignan

    Dear Editor

    I very much enjoyed reading the Review article [1] by Professor Noakes and the letter [2] in the same edition of the BJSM July 2008.

    As he rightly states measurement of VO2max has several limitations in determining an athlete's potential. He also pointed out in the letter that research has shown that 'the rating of perceived exertion (RPE) rises as a linear function of the duration of...

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  • Measuring joint position sense
    Francois Tremblay

    Dear Editor

    I read with interest the study by Panics et al on the effect of proprioceptive training on joint position sense (JPS)at the knee. The authors report a significant improvement in JPS in terms of reduction in mean absolute error after the training.

    I have several concerns, however, regarding the methods used by the author to assess JPS. First, looking at Fig 1, one can ask as to how the positioning of...

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  • The Hill model does exist
    Samuele M Marcora

    To the Editor: In my opinion the negative influence of Nobel Laureate AV Hill on subsequent generations of exercise physiologists is not about the plateau in VO2 or other physiological concepts criticized by Professor Tim Noakes in his article. Hill’s influence is much deeper than that. It is about the fundamental assumption over which the current physiological model of exercise tolerance has been built over the years: In well-...

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  • The interpretation of mile world-record split times
    Jo Corbett

    Dear Editor,

    In the recent article published online (18th April, 2008) Noakes et al. (2008) present some interesting data detailing lap-times recorded en- route to world record performances in the one mile run. These data show that, on average, the times for the second and third laps were significantly slower than those for the first and last lap. Subsequently, Noakes et al. (2008) interpret these data as being sup...

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  • Travel fatigue and jet-lag are not synonyms
    Thomas Reilly

    Dear Editor,

    Travel fatigue and jet-lag are not synonyms

    We were pleased to see the ‘original article’ by Milne and Shaw (2008) offering advice for those travelling to the Beijing Summer Olympics Games in August later this year in a professional or participatory capacity. The authors are to be complimented on their endeavours to accommodate a comprehensive range of environmental aspects that might influe...

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  • The effect of the new scrum Law?
    Henare. R. Broughton

    Dear Editor

    The authors have attempted to suggest that the new Law, that is Law 20.1.(h) in Laws of the game rugby union, 2007 has had an influence on reducing claim applications to the ACC. It may be so that there were less claims made within the period of the study but it would be difficult to link an association with the new Law and the effect it might have on the neck and back, even if it is performed as is st...

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  • Measuring joint position sense
    Francois Tremblay

    Dear editor

    I read with interest the study by Panics et al on the effect of proprioceptive training on joint position sense (JPS)at the knee. The authors report a significant improvement in JPS in terms of reduction in mean absolute error after the training. I have several concerns, however, regarding the methods used by the author to assess JPS. First, looking at Fig 1, one can ask as to how the positioning of t...

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  • Yet another possible explanation
    Eric C Westman

    Thank you for this contemporary assessment of dietary intake among the Masai pastoralists. Through the paradigm-shifting lens of a recent comprehensive summary of the lack of science to implicate saturated fat as a cause for heart disease [1], and new studies which suggest carbohydrate to be more worrisome than saturated fat for atherogenesis [2-4], there is a simple explanation for why the Masai do not develop atheroscle...

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  • cricketers longevity study deeply flawed
    Stephen J Pittard

    Dear Editor

    Utter nonsense. The study laughably considers WG , Ranji, Jardine & Larwood to have been failures, whilst Reg Simpson, Peter Richardson & Bob Barber – batsmen who all averaged in the mid 30s - were bizarrely thought of as successes.

    The flaw was in the chosen criteria for success ( 25 Tests). Far fewer Test matches were played years ago thus those born in the 1900s - who died,...

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  • Comment
    Bart Pijls

    Dear Editor

    We have read with great interest the article by Silva et al and acknowledge their innovating and pioneering work in the field of shoulder dyskinesia. Their research uncovered a greater dynamic reduction in subacromial space in tennis players with shoulder dyskinesia (19.3 mm), compared to tennis players without shoulder dyskinesia (13.8 mm). The authors claim there would be an average difference in dy...

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